about ac current

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by nikhilthunderlion, Oct 4, 2007.

  1. nikhilthunderlion

    Thread Starter Member

    Oct 1, 2007
    23
    0
    for dc circuit ,for a fixed resistor if applied voltage is high than current is how .but in ac circuit if ac voltage is high than ac current can be low is it true, if yes tell me how?
     
  2. cumesoftware

    Senior Member

    Apr 27, 2007
    1,330
    10
    The Ohm's law aplies to both AC powered resistors and DC powered resistors. In principle, for a fixed resistor, the higher the voltage is, the higher the current is.
     
  3. thingmaker3

    Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
    5,072
    6
    E = I*R, therefore I = E/R
     
  4. ixisuprflyixi

    Active Member

    Sep 16, 2007
    52
    1
    It is not necessary for the current to be high in a resistor in DC or AC that depends on the resistance not the voltage, it is possible but certainly not necessary. For a resistor in a DC circuit the current could be very low depending on the resistance its the same with AC.
     
  5. techroomt

    Senior Member

    May 19, 2004
    198
    1
    in ac or dc, the current and voltage are "directly proportional" in a fixed resistor. in other words, if voltage goes up, the current will also go up a proportional amount. if voltage were to double, the current would double. if voltage were halved, current would half.
     
  6. ixisuprflyixi

    Active Member

    Sep 16, 2007
    52
    1
    I am not objecting to that. What I am saying is that a "high voltage" does not necessitate a high current. So, it is (possible) to have a high voltage but still a low current. It all depends upon the resistance.
     
  7. cumesoftware

    Senior Member

    Apr 27, 2007
    1,330
    10
    Well, the point is that in a fixed resistor, the higher the potential difference at is terminals, the higher the current that biases it. Evidently, if we have a variable resistor being fed by a constant voltage, the lower the resistance, the higher the current. Again Ohm's law. Lots of possiblities, but there is no need to loose the focus here when the question was about a fixed resistor and a variable voltage.

    Although being informative, you might confuse members that are new to electronics. Of course, I'm not discouraging you from doing that. Just showing the bad side of it.
     
  8. ixisuprflyixi

    Active Member

    Sep 16, 2007
    52
    1
    hmm I thought I was trying to clear up the memebers confusion. You cant please all of the people all of the time.
     
  9. recca02

    Senior Member

    Apr 2, 2007
    1,211
    0
    the confusion of OP might be due to transformation achieved with the help of transformers where the primary may have low voltage and high current and secondary might have high voltage and low current but still the ohms law applies
    it is just that the resistance is transferred to the primary as low.
    one more thing though something similar can be achieved with DC as well so there shud be no controversy about AC or DC not following ohm's law.
     
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