A8Q3.Voltage values

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by lemon, Feb 28, 2010.

  1. lemon

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 28, 2010
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    Hi:
    I have answered the questions to a problem but am not sure I am right. Would somebody be good enough to check please.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    Have you been directed to work in the CGS units? If so, I think you may need to convert 1.2Tesla into the equivalent value in Gauss?

    hgmjr
     
  3. lemon

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 28, 2010
    125
    2
    No. We work in SI units. The Tesla is the correct unit for us
     
  4. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    Yes. Tesla is consistent with SI units. Since SI is the stipulated units, then you need to convert the units of measure for length to meters instead of centimeters. Right?

    hgmjr
     
  5. lemon

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 28, 2010
    125
    2
    yes. From mm to meters. I did that for the 75mm x 75mm into 0.75m^2
     
  6. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    1000 mm = 1 meter, then 75mm = .075 meters. Right?

    hgmjr
     
  7. lemon

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 28, 2010
    125
    2
    I see your point:)

    [​IMG]

    why do I have the same values for E-max and E-rms?
    Are the results ok now?
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2010
  8. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    I think that the formula for the Vpeak is:

    Epeak = NABf.

    I believe that Faraday's Law uses frequency rather than radians in the formula.

    Epeak = 3600 * 0.005625 * 1.2 * 75 = 1822.5 volts

    I think it would be a good idea to get someone else in the forum to put their 0.02 worth into this discussion.


    hgmjr
     
  9. lemon

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 28, 2010
    125
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    is it not BAN2∏f?
     
  10. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    I did some googling and some of the sites seem to use frequency. Then I looked at other sites and they supported the 2*pi()*f factor. I would go by the information contained in your textbook just to be safe.

    hgmjr
     
  11. lemon

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 28, 2010
    125
    2
    I'm going with you.
    Which would make E-rms=1822.5/√2
    =1288.702109V
    or 1.3kV (2s.f.), right?
     
  12. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    That is the answer I get based on frequency. What does your textbook say?

    hgmjr
     
  13. lemon

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 28, 2010
    125
    2
    the answer is based on omega in our book. I must go with that.
    Thanks for your help :)
     
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