A Wireless Score Counter

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Cheng Fei Hui, Jan 4, 2016.

  1. Cheng Fei Hui

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 4, 2016
    3
    0
    Hey Guys, this is my first post and it is for an Electronic Project which i have to complete for school.

    my project is basically a Sports counter where the score can be changed by a 4026 Decade counter. the switch which is used for this counter will be a 24 DC wireless switch. the wireless switch from the link below is the one which i will be using, as 24 V DC is quite a large voltage to use in a small project like what i am trying to produce. i do not know what the values of the resistors and capacitors should be. the chips i also use will probably not be able to withstand a voltage of 24 volts DC. i am using a 555 Monostable which will be linked to the decade counter.

    (http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00Y0HYDVG?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00)

    Attached to this thread is the circuit which i will be using, For each switch for the 555 Monostable will be linked to the wireless switch. this is so the score on the counter will be able to increase by a count wirelessly. the trouble is, i do not want to create this circuit in real life just in case the components become damaged because i have the wrong values.

    on the software circuit wizards, if i included resistors before the 7 segment displays, the display wouldnt light up. therefore they were left out. from the knowledge i currently i have, i would use a 330 ohm resistor there. please correct me if i am wrong.
    Also if there is anything wrong with my circuit please tell me

    thanks guys for reading my thread

    ps, is it savable if i use a 24Volt DC switch instead of a 12Volts one. i think i made the wrong purchase
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2016
  2. Cheng Fei Hui

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 4, 2016
    3
    0
    There is also a 6V DC wireless switch. if that helps anyone, because clearly i have bought the wrong switch
     
  3. AnalogKid

    Distinguished Member

    Aug 1, 2013
    4,515
    1,246
    Because the receivers have relay outputs, there is no requirement for the receivers and the counter circuit to have the same power supply voltage. However, if you want to have only one system power supply and no batteries, get the 12 V receivers and power your circuit from the same 12 V.

    Add a 10 K resistor from the reset input of each counter to GND.

    Read the 4026 datasheet to see what the maximum allowed segment current, and select segment resistors accordingly.

    ak
     
  4. Cheng Fei Hui

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 4, 2016
    3
    0
    I think i will use batteries for my project, so it doesnt matter that the receiver needs 24volts? it will run fine on the 9 volts supplied from 3 AA Batteries?

    thanks for the help
     
  5. AnalogKid

    Distinguished Member

    Aug 1, 2013
    4,515
    1,246
    9 V requires *six* AA batteries.

    ak
     
Loading...