A switch that switches between two remote controllers and four devices

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by freshcoffee, Jul 24, 2016.

  1. freshcoffee

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 24, 2015
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    Hello,

    i am trying to build a switch like a draw below.

    control-idea.png

    I have two remote controllers, A, B. and they control A# and B# each
    i am trying make a switch that can handle
    A controls A1
    B controls B1
    then switch.
    A controls A2,
    B control B2

    device A1,2 B1,2 has own power source.

    with my limited knowledge, i am guessing that i would need total 10pole A/B switch for my project,
    but i was only able to find 2 or 3 pole switch not more than 4 or 5 poles.
    so i am just guessing, it has to be done by some digital switch made by arduino or raspbery pi... something like that...
    regarding those, it's my just guts filling because i have no idea how to use and what they do exactly though.

    could you help me on this?

    thank you in advance.
     
  2. AlbertHall

    Well-Known Member

    Jun 4, 2014
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  3. jpanhalt

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 18, 2008
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    That rotary switch description seems a bit fishy to me. I believe the TS could use two or three multipole, double throw relays wired to actuate in unison. Here's a link to a 4-pole, double-throw version (http://media.digikey.com/pdf/Data Sheets/Panasonic Electric Works PDFs/HC_Series.pdf) at about $15 each. You would need three. A 6PDT version is about $44 each (http://www.digikey.com/product-deta...rumfield-relays/R10-E1Z6-V430/PB775-ND/813841)

    That will result in break before make, and the actions of the 7-wire circuit might not be exactly simultaneous. How critical is the switching sequence?

    One might also consider using analog switch IC's.

    John
     
  4. AlbertHall

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  5. freshcoffee

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 24, 2015
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    John, thanks for suggestion,
    switching is not that critical. it's wired remote control and it's ok to complete the switching within 1sec. i think
    i've never used those kind of relay(?) so i need to research little more to find out how to use..

    thanks,
     
  6. freshcoffee

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    Mar 24, 2015
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  7. AlbertHall

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    No computer needed. The boards have an input for each relay, so you can just tie all the inputs together to a simple toggle switch to operate all the relays together. The relay board will need a supply voltage (commonly 12V) which could also be used for the switch.
     
  8. freshcoffee

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 24, 2015
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    i searched and found that 5v relay board, was wondering if 5v relay would work too for my project?
    i just think lower voltage board is safe... just think..
     
  9. freshcoffee

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 24, 2015
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    i've done some homework and brainstormed like below.

    IMG_0131.jpg
    would this work? any flaw?

    thank you in advance agin
     
  10. jpanhalt

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    Jan 18, 2008
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    Yes, that is correct. The one thing you may need to add is a pull-down or pull-up resistor to each device's inputs. Some devices do not like their inputs to "float" in an unknown state. So, after you wire it up, if devices "2" act funny while devices "1" are attached, add a pull-down resistor from each wire of each device to ground. Something light 4.7 KΩ to 10 KΩ should work.* If you have the schematic of each device that would help. Wires that supply power, as compared to signal, to the devices do not need to be pulled down.

    *Edit: Assuming the control voltages are not more than 12V or so.

    John
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2016
  11. freshcoffee

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 24, 2015
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    John, thanks for your input.
    did i understand correctly?

    IMG_0132.jpg

    by the way, Remote A is a remote control for Camera's zoom.
    i am trying to use One Remote to control "zoom in/out" for two cameras one at a time.
     
  12. AlbertHall

    Well-Known Member

    Jun 4, 2014
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    If the relay board you found is similar to the one I linked to earlier then the inputs need to be connected to ground to operate the relay, so just link all the IN1, IN2,... etc. to ground.

    Your power supply wiring is wrong.
    Connect all the grounds and PSU negative together.
    Connect the +5V to the common terminal on the switch (generally the centre terminal)
    and connect the relay board VCCs to one end terminal on the switch.
    Then operating the switch will operate or release all the relays.

    Do you have a link to 5V boards that you found?
     
  13. jpanhalt

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 18, 2008
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    No, you have the resistors in series. A pull-down resistor goes from a signal line to ground, or in the alternative, a pull-up resistor goes from the signal wire to V+. Now that we know you are running two camera zooms, it is almost certain some of the wires you want to switch are power (battery + and ground) .

    Ground almost certainly doesn't need to be switched. It is likely that battery + (V+) doesn't need to be switched either. Some of the other lines might not need to be switched either. Do you know what any of the wires do?

    John
     
  14. freshcoffee

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    Mar 24, 2015
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  15. jpanhalt

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    That does not address my concerns about floating inputs. Let me emphasize that concern is only in theory. It may not affect operation at all. The inputs to the camera zoom may already have adequate protection against floating.

    However, since the basic principle of using a relay is established, can we get back to what the wires do? Which ones connect to the battery? They may not need to be switched. You have 10 wires to each device, I suspect most are not involved in controlling the zoom.

    John
     
  16. freshcoffee

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 24, 2015
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    in the draw, Remote A doesn't require a battery. normally that remote is wired and connected to the cam's LANC port.
    also, Zoom remote wire is 3wires, other 7 wires for another function remote control and this remote doesn't require a battery either.
     
  17. jpanhalt

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    Jan 18, 2008
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    OK

    Here is what I meant by pull-down resistors:

    upload_2016-7-25_17-39-20.png

    Putting the resistor on the common (center of relay) doesn't help.

    I would wire up one and see if it works without the pull-down resistors.

    How far will the cameras be from the relay? Distance may be limited. Not sure how much, but less than 3 m should be fine.

    John
     
  18. freshcoffee

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 24, 2015
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    Oh, now i understand how it should be.
    yes i will test first and see it's acting up, then i would try your suggestion.
    the relay will be around 50ft away from the camera, which means current remote control is that far and work ok now.
     
  19. jpanhalt

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    That's good news. When you mentioned LANC, I was concerned about the distance. Do you use twisted pair wire? It sounds like you have a solution, which might not be very elegant, but will probably work.

    Please keep us updated.

    John
     
  20. freshcoffee

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 24, 2015
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    yes fortunately LANC work ok for that much distance.
    i cut and extend standard 3ft remote control with belden 9451 2conduct and 1 shield cable

    sure thing, i will keep update.

    thank you very much
     
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