A new technology for air conditioning

Discussion in 'Physics' started by cmartinez, Jul 21, 2016.

  1. cmartinez

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  2. jpanhalt

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    Great new inventions, but about 90 years too late: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Einstein_refrigerator

    Edit: Oops, didn't read the whole article. I still wonder whether the desiccant can keep pace with way more than 2 liters per hour of water produced.

    John
     
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  3. cmartinez

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    Yeah, I've heard of Einstein's fridge, which I think he co-invented with some other guy to reduce the deaths caused by leaked ammonia used by the old technology. It is my understanding that about the same time that his invention came out, a safe cooling gas alternative was implemented (was it freon?) so his idea never really reached the domestic market. Although it is being used in facilities that require a very high degree of safety against leaks, such as nuclear reactors, I think.
     
  4. #12

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    That is a new method!
    Enabled by the fuel cell technology.
    Not for small stuff like residential, but the large scale method apparently works.

    Einstein didn't have fuel cells.:D
    Anyway, the small scale Einstein cooler works, and it uses ammonia.
     
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  5. jpanhalt

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    Sorry, guys. I edited my original post having reacted mainly to the title. BTW, my first vacuum pump, which was used as a fore-pump for a mercury diffusion pump, was scavenged from a sulfur-dioxide refrigerator. Fun times venting the S02 in LA. I am certain it did not contribute significantly to the smog at that time. Thousands of kids were not doing the same thing.

    John
     
  6. BR-549

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    I quit reading when it said dry air. No dry air here.
     
  7. #12

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    Here's an old story: My wife phoned me from work and said they were locking down the building and shutting off the air conditioners because of an ammonia leak in some nearby building. My response was, That seems backwards. In a building that size some idiot is going to try to open a window when the A/C stops. Besides, ammonia loves water, and it loves cold water even better. The best way to take ammonia out of the air is to run it across a cold, wet, air conditioner coil.

    Little did I know that my recommendations would be told to, "management" and the air conditioners were back on within 20 minutes.:eek:
    They never sent me a consulting fee.:(
     
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  8. #12

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    Thanks. That quenches my urge to write the book on A/C history and post it here.:D
     
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  9. #12

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    Keep reading. This is a method to work with humid air.
     
  10. #12

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    It's all a matter of scale, and the heat used to regenerate the desiccant is scavenged to make electricity. That's the main reason this design works. Drying the desiccant at 600F would be a game stopper if that energy wasn't recovered as electrical power.
     
  11. GopherT

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    That explains a lot. You always seem to stop whenever reality doesn't match your imagination.
     
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  12. KeepItSimpleStupid

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  13. MrAl

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    Hello there,

    There actually is a relatively new technology for air conditioning. It uses a stream of air to produce a cooler area. The stream of air is directed at an angle to a surface and the stream plus the angle produce the cooling effect. Dont remember what it is called now or exactly why it works but you can probably find it on the web somewhere.
    But that is mainly it, a strong stream of air angled at some surface.

    Of course we also have Peltier devices :)
     
  14. GopherT

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    A bit of research with the aid of Google and I come up with "fan"
     
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  15. cmartinez

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    gee... I thought that technology was called ventilator :p
     
  16. GopherT

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    You probably call a vacuum cleaner an Aspirator, too.
     
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  17. cmartinez

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    Actually... I like to call it an Air Sucker ... :p
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2016
  18. GopherT

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    Now you made me google it to confirm, a slight variation from French.
    aspiradora
     
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  19. cmartinez

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    Exactly! ... but sometimes things don't translate well between english and spanish, even when the word shares exactly the same etymology.
    See: embarrassed and embarazo, or cynic and cínico
     
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  20. GopherT

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    Between English and Spanish, sometimes. Between French and Spanish, rarely.
     
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