6V 1a DC UPS

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by hariharan5, Jan 12, 2016.

  1. hariharan5

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 12, 2016
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    Hi,
    I want to make a small / mini UPS for my cordless phone with battery over charging and deep discharging protection. The base requires 6V DC and 1amp. Can anyone help me with a circuit for this?
     
  2. Alec_t

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 17, 2013
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    Welcome to AAC!
    Doesn't your phone have its own internal overcharge/discharge protection built in? As far as I know most phones do, and just require a 5V external supply for charging.
     
  3. hariharan5

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 12, 2016
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    As far as the handset is concern what you said is exactly correct. The cordless base unit don't have any backup power. when power goes up in no way I can make a call. What exactly I want is a online UPS (with 5V 1A rating) capable of powering the cordless base unit.
     
  4. BillB3857

    Senior Member

    Feb 28, 2009
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    I don't think the OP is talking about a CELL phone; rather a wireless handset for a landline usually powered by a wall-wart.
     
  5. dl324

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 30, 2015
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    Welcome to AAC!
    Post your schematic, the type of battery you plan to use, the voltage range for the base, the low voltage cut out point, and any other relevant details.
     
  6. AnalogKid

    Distinguished Member

    Aug 1, 2013
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    If you really want to build something, what you are describing can be done safely and without a lot of complexity. However, it might actually cost less to buy the smallest offline UPS you can find and plug the base station wall wart into it. On the base station, what is the power rating on the model number label? It probably is the same or less than the ratings on the wall wart. With the base station voltage and current, you can calculate how big a battery you need depending on the hold-up time you want.

    ak
     
  7. dl324

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 30, 2015
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    That's a good solution.

    I live in an area where we lose power too frequently and, sometimes, for days at a time. I put our DSL modem on a UPS so my kids still have internet access for school. I also put the satellite box and DVR on one so they wouldn't lose programming; unfortunately, when we lose power it's often long enough to run the UPS down...
     
  8. hariharan5

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 12, 2016
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    I am a software guy. Have no idea about electronics. Just want to do this as hobby. What all I know is the spec. of the base. The base requires 5V and 1A. You suggest me anything in this regard including battery. may be 30 mins backup is enough for me.
     
  9. hariharan5

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 12, 2016
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    Yes I can buy a UPS. But that is bigger in size and I couldn't find a UPS which delivers 5V DC directly. So I thought of making it. But I am software guy with no electronics designing knowledge. Hence I posted here to get some help.
    What exactly I want is - A online UPS which is capable of delivering DC 5V 1A output directly for about 30 mins.
     
  10. AnalogKid

    Distinguished Member

    Aug 1, 2013
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    5 V x 1 A x 30 min = 2.5 watt hours (W-h) or 0.5 amp-hours (A-h) at 5 V.
    AA lithium batteries are around 2000 mA-h, or 2 A-H at 1.5 V.
    3 AA batteries are 2 A-h at 4.5 V
    So a Ray-O Vac lithium battery charger and 4 batteries will do this with a battery holder and a cable. $20 at Kroger, less on ebay. Charge the batteries once month to keep them topped off.

    ak
     
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  11. hariharan5

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 12, 2016
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    Thank you
     
  12. AnalogKid

    Distinguished Member

    Aug 1, 2013
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    To be clear, whipping up a 5 V UPS is not a complex or difficult task, and you would get loads of help here. It could be a simple as a small sealed lead-acid battery (SLA), the smallest version of what is used in standard UPS's, plus a 9 V or 12 V wall wart and 1 resistor. From there you could add circuit features to get a faster recharge time, some blinky lights, etc. Some people ask about a circuit because they can't see any other way, and some ask because they want to solder stuff with blinky lights. Your call.

    ak
     
  13. dl324

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 30, 2015
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    Before you can design anything, you need to understand the requirements.

    I suspect when you're specifying 5V@1A (or is it 6V, you've mentioned both), you're reading something from the base unit and not measuring or examining the circuit/schematic. If you don't know if the requirements, you can't design a proper battery backup. No battery chemistry that I'm aware of will give you exactly 5V (or 6V). What is the tolerance of the circuit in question? You could use an LDO regulator, but doing that when you don't need one simply wastes power.

    You could use the backup only when power is interrupted or you could use it to always power your base unit.

    You want a low voltage cut out, but what voltage is appropriate?

    I get that you want to expand your knowledge but, before you can start narrowing options, you need to establish requirements.
     
  14. Roderick Young

    Member

    Feb 22, 2015
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    Two things come to mind. One is that if you just need the functionality, you can buy an external laptop battery from eBay, keep that plugged in, and plug the phone into the output of that. If mains power ever goes out, you should have hours of talk time.

    The second thought is that the 1A requirement is probably just for charging the handset. When the handset is fully charged, maybe the phone doesn't take much power at all, even if people are talking on the phone. If that's the case, you may be able to get away with 2-3 supercapacitors in series, directly across the 5V or 6V power inside the phone.
     
  15. hariharan5

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 12, 2016
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    Thanks for the reply. Why I was asking for a circuit is, I want to do it all my self including the step down stage, Charging circuit, Over Charge protection of battery etc.
     
  16. hariharan5

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 12, 2016
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    Thanks for your reply. Sorry for the typo error. Its is DC 5V 1amp that is what I could read from the cordless phone base. I measured the wall wart voltage. That varied between 4.99V to 5.2V. I googled and found that over charging protection is required to protect the battery life. I really don't know about low voltage cut off.
     
  17. hariharan5

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 12, 2016
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    Thanks. But what I actually want is a circuit so that I can do it all by myself. Just curious.
     
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