60 Hz

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Lightfire, Apr 21, 2011.

  1. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
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    Hello,

    After searching at the dictionary, I found out what does Hz means. But I have to clarify it because it might be different.

    OK, our circuit breaker is rated as 240 volts 60 Hz.

    So means that, if our circuit breaker is rated as 60 Hz, it means it can handle alternating current electric current that reverses 60 times in a second.

    Am I correct?

    Thanks!
     
  2. strantor

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 3, 2010
    4,302
    1,988
    correct, as long at the voltage is 240
     
  3. DerStrom8

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2011
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    Yes, Hz is short for Hertz. Heinrich Hertz is famous for his work with radio waves. Hz means cycles per second (frequency). If you look at a model of an electromagnetic wave, you will see several peaks. One Hz (cycle) would be how many times it goes from peak-to-peak within one second.
    I hope this helps!
    Der Strom
     
  4. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
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    What "as long at the voltage 240"?
     
  5. DerStrom8

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2011
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    "As long AS the voltage IS 240". If the frequency is still 60 Hz, but at 440 volts, you'll still be in trouble :D
     
  6. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
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    Why would I be in trouble? ;)
     
  7. russ_hensel

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 11, 2009
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    it reverses 120 times a second. a full wave is 2 reversals.
     
  8. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
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    I thought 60 times a second?
     
  9. mbohuntr

    Active Member

    Apr 6, 2009
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    AC voltage "alternates" positive to negative and back to the beginning making one cycle. The frequency is how many cycles per second it rotates. The Voltage or "Amplitide" is the measurement of the height of the wave above zero. (peak voltage) If you measure it from the highest point above zero, to the lowest point below zero, it's called
    "peak to peak" . AC Voltage can be created at any frequency, but the standard is 60 hz for US and others, and 50 hz in parts of Europe and Japan. See this..
    .http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/vol_2/chpt_1/2.html
     
  10. mbohuntr

    Active Member

    Apr 6, 2009
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  11. magnet18

    Senior Member

    Dec 22, 2010
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    I thought 2 phase form the power companies was 180° out of phase?

    To answer lightfires question, one hertz is one cycle per second. one cycle is going back AND forth.
    If you have a 60Hz voltage source, it cycles 60 times a second, which is the same as going back and forth 120 times a second.
     
  12. mbohuntr

    Active Member

    Apr 6, 2009
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    Actually, what you are seeing is the magnetic field which is out of phase with the actual voltage it creates. Commercial generation is three phase(Three individual sets of poles) 120 degrees apart. Check out the three phase simulation a couple of pages down.
     
  13. DerStrom8

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2011
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    Yes, I apologize. I should not have worded it that way. I meant from, for example, the top of one peak to the top of the next one (above zero). As Russ said, one full wave is two reversals of current.
    Der Strom
     
  14. magnet18

    Senior Member

    Dec 22, 2010
    1,232
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    Right, makes sense, thanks

    Yea, I knew about three phase...
    Wait, isn't the power coming from the wall actually one phase, not two...
    *facepalm
    Never-mind then.
    :rolleyes:
     
  15. mbohuntr

    Active Member

    Apr 6, 2009
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    *facepalm
    Never-mind then.
    :rolleyes:[/QUOTE]

    Welcome to MY world...I do it frequently... :D
     
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