5W power LED in series to 220V mains for aquarium, How can I do that ?

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Ronald Saraswat, Apr 2, 2015.

  1. Ronald Saraswat

    Thread Starter Member

    Apr 2, 2015
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    I want to put 5W power LEDs having 12V input in a series configuration to light up my aquarium (approx 20-25 LED's). How can I do that ?
    I wish to light up an aquarium and a lot of failed divers and DIY supplies I have tried but to no avail, can someone over here please guide me through with a possible way out of it, or is it not possible to be done. I guess not, there is nothing that can not be done, So kindly someone please shed some light.

    I have tried transformers converted to DC 12V but LED's burned on it, after a few time. I so need to work this out, please somebody help ! This is the POWER LED am talking bout attached,
     
  2. blocco a spirale

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jun 18, 2008
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    Why don't you buy LEDs with matching drivers? It's not worth DIYing these things.
     
  3. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    I believe the problem is that you think a Light Emitting Diode is a light bulb. It isn't. It's a diode.
    You have to use a resistor or a regulator to limit the available current.
     
  4. Ronald Saraswat

    Thread Starter Member

    Apr 2, 2015
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    But I already have these LED chips with me, and LEDs with matching drivers are not worth the money for this project as I need high intensity light that only, Power LEDs can provide to me , and be cost effective in the long run, But they don't have Drivers for Power LEDs over here, they just say to run it on a 12v adapter, I did that, but sooner or later either the adapter r the LED fails. I need to by pass it, so as to null the need of a driver, and get it running directly from the mains, someone told that it can be done, If I join the LED's in series and add up there voltage to mains supply, like 18 12v LEDs would suffice, can it be done that way ? with bridge rectifier for converting AC to DC ?
     
  5. MikeML

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 2, 2009
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    Besides driving them with regulated current (not voltage), you also have to mount 5W LED chips on a very large heat sink!!!!!
     
  6. Ronald Saraswat

    Thread Starter Member

    Apr 2, 2015
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    How to add up resistor or regulator for this setup, can you please guide me ?
     
  7. blocco a spirale

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    I suspect this thread is about to close.......
     
  8. Ronald Saraswat

    Thread Starter Member

    Apr 2, 2015
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    I have the Heat sinks with me too, I just can't figure out the circuit required for it to work !
     
  9. Ronald Saraswat

    Thread Starter Member

    Apr 2, 2015
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    Oh sir please, help out I know something can be made out of this, I just need some guidance on the stuff.
     
  10. wayneh

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    Sep 9, 2010
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    Sorry, mains-powered LED projects are a forbidden topic here.
     
  11. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    1)Not worth the money? That settles this discussion.
    2)Where is, "over here"?
    3)You can't, "null the need for a driver". That's like nulling the need for brakes on your car.
    4)"Someone told me"? Have him fix it!
    5)This site refuses to explain how to connect tiny parts directly to the 220 volt power lines.
     
    blueroomelectronics likes this.
  12. Ronald Saraswat

    Thread Starter Member

    Apr 2, 2015
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    Ok so how can I do it on DC 12v , can I plug it on computer SMPS ? that can be done, but how and what resistor would I need to make it work ?
     
  13. blocco a spirale

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    [QUOTE=" I need to by pass it, so as to null the need of a driver, and get it running directly from the mains, someone told that it can be done, If I join the LED's in series and add up there voltage to mains supply, like 18 12v LEDs would suffice, can it be done that way ? with bridge rectifier for converting AC to DC ?[/QUOTE]

    I cannot help you. You must buy the correct driver.
     
  14. Ronald Saraswat

    Thread Starter Member

    Apr 2, 2015
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    Ohkay thank you very much :) That clears my confusion for the mains thing, but what about DC 12v ? I used a transformer to convert 220V AC to 12V dc, and that burned the led after a while, The LED's I have don't have a Vf value on them, they just state Power LED 5W on 12v input, what resistor can I use to limit burning the LED, and would it be better in series or parallel ?
     
  15. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
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    Well, 5W at 12V is almost 1/2 amp, so your PSU would need to have a 12V line rated to over 10A. If you have such a thing, you could place the LEDs in parallel onto the 12V bus.

    You say the LEDs are "12V". Are you certain that they are for direct connection to a 12V supply (meaning they have internal current regulation)? Details on the LEDs would help folks here to help you.
     
  16. Dodgydave

    Distinguished Member

    Jun 22, 2012
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    Firstly use a transformer to step down to the voltage you need, DONT CONNECT LEDS TO MAINS!!!, what is the forward voltage drop and current of the led?

    so say its 3V ,ten in series is 30V, so you need a transformer for that voltage.
     
  17. Ronald Saraswat

    Thread Starter Member

    Apr 2, 2015
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    I cannot help you. You must buy the correct driver.[/QUOTE]


    Well If that is the case, You people helped me clear my confusion so thanks for that, I will go to the market and look for a specific driver for my needs, but when I have previously asked people at mart about the driver for this specification they had no idea bout it, So If you can tell which particular driver I should be looking for it would be very helpful, is there some particular specification I must be looking for this multi LED setup to be done ?
     
  18. #12

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    Nov 30, 2010
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    I would start with about 30 ohms, 5 watts, in series with the LED and connect 12 VDC to the circuit. Then measure the voltage across the LED. That will get you a number to do the math with using Watts Law and Ohm's Law.

    The photo in post #1 shows no evidence of a resistor...but I might be wrong.
     
  19. Ronald Saraswat

    Thread Starter Member

    Apr 2, 2015
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    The people who sold it, said that they are supposed to be directly connected onto a 12V dc adaptor, those fellas really didn't elaborate that what specific current requirements the LED has, but I searched the internet and gt to know they are 5Watt High Power LEDs, and when you say I can connect to 12v dc with 10amp rating in parallel, do i not need a resistor in that case ?

    I wish I could arrange the the Vf and current requirements but I don't have them. :(
     
  20. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    Is there some particular part of this planet where you are? Do you want the answer for Poland? China? Holland?
     
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