50HZ 180° phase shifter

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by DedeHai, Jun 6, 2009.

  1. DedeHai

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jan 22, 2009
    39
    0
    Hi everyone

    I am looking for a simple way to shift the voltage of a 230Vrms AC sinusoidal signal by 180 degrees without the use of a transformer.
    The goal is to have the electronics as small as possible but by no means bigger than a fingernail.
    The power throughput can be as low as 100mW and the efficiency does not matter (it should not burn up though ;))
    Is there a simple solution to that? I tried playing with inductors and resistors in LTspice but it got me nowhere (no noticable phase shift for small inductor values).

    thanks
     
  2. DC_Kid

    Distinguished Member

    Feb 25, 2008
    638
    9
    phase shift what? I or V ?? caps and inductors provide phase seperation. and getting 180 seperation using passive means might be tough.
     
  3. mik3

    Senior Member

    Feb 4, 2008
    4,846
    63
    Why do you want to phase shift the voltage?

    What will you power?
     
  4. KL7AJ

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 4, 2008
    2,039
    287

    Howdy.

    Do you have to have a ground reference? If not, you can just switch the polarity of the leads!

    Eric
     
  5. DedeHai

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jan 22, 2009
    39
    0
    I just made a drawing of what I want to do with the signal and realized: I need a 90° shift, not 180°.

    So what I need is to shift the Voltage by 90°. The problem is, that I have a capacitive load that has a high series resistance (a few pF with a series resistance of about 10kOhms). The simplest way would be to add an inductance so the total impedance is dominated by the inductor.
    Any suggestion? Keep in mind that the electronics have to be really small, so an inductance above 50uH is hard to achieve.
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2009
  6. DC_Kid

    Distinguished Member

    Feb 25, 2008
    638
    9
    AAC has some tutorials on this:
    http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/vol_2/chpt_4/2.html
     
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