50-60 Hz Converter

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Navron, May 18, 2014.

  1. Navron

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 18, 2014
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    Hi everyone,

    I have been searching Google trying to find a suitable circuit with the following specification:

    Input: 110 Vac, 50 Hz, 10 A
    Output: 110 Vac, 60 Hz, 10 A

    Does anyone have any ideas? The voltage and current levels stated here can be different.

    Thanks in asvance
     
  2. Experimentonomen

    Member

    Feb 16, 2011
    331
    46
    As far as i know you can buy static phase converters that takes 110-230VAC 50/60Hz in and outputs 50-400Hz.

    Stuff like this is NOT i repeat NOT for the beginner.
     
  3. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    What do you have that is frequency sensitive?
    Max.
     
  4. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
    5,435
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    And does it NEED 10 amps?

    That 10A requirement really increases the cost and building hassle. Basically it forces you to build a 1.1 kW inverter!
     
  5. Navron

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 18, 2014
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    Ok, to start off, the current level can be much lower. Say 2A. Once I am able to build it at that level, I will be able to create the 10A device.
     
  6. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    Still no idea what is the purpose?
    Component/system?
    Max.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2014
  7. alfacliff

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 13, 2013
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    how about a 50 hz motor driving a 60 hz alternator? at these power levels, it might be cost effective, especially if you can get either surplus.
     
  8. Navron

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 18, 2014
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    The purpose if to run general purpose electronic devices that operate on 60 Hz.The power mains in my country deliver electricity at 50 Hz.
     
  9. Navron

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 18, 2014
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    I am not sure how efficient such a set-up would be. I am looking to create a simpler device with mostly solid state electronic components. I am willing to create a device of much lower power levels (i.e at say 1A or 2A maximum)
     
  10. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
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    These days the majority of devices that run from mains are NOT frequency dependent.

    You have to try hard to find something that does need 50/60Hz. Like some types of electric motors, or devices with old-style laminated mains freq transformers.
     
  11. shteii01

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2010
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    Like THE RB said, generally the "bricks" that come with electronic devices don't need specific frequency.

    For example. I am looking at a brick from some toshiba device, might have been old laptop or something. It says:
    Input: 100V-240V AC, 0.35A-0.15A, 50-60 Hz.

    Mine says: Model: PA8713U. I think it is from 1990.

    So it clearly shows that it will work with US and Euro voltages and frequencies.

    Here is example from the internets:

    [​IMG]
     
  12. Navron

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 18, 2014
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    Right, however wile most devices will run on either frequency, the problem of efficiency arises whenever there is a frequency mismatch.
     
  13. Experimentonomen

    Member

    Feb 16, 2011
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    46
    There are certain manufacturers that do include a line frequency sensing circuit to discourage exporting/importing of thir products through ebay and such.

    One such is Krell, they started doing this after units imported via ebay failed and ppl demanded warranty repairs, Krell lost huge money on this.

    Due to this Krell nowdays include a circuit in their produts that prevent them from turning on if the line frequency doesent match the one for the country the product was originally sold in.
     
  14. Bernard

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 7, 2008
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    From long ago, I multiplied 60 Hz to 300 Hz with phase locked loop, then divided down to 50 Hz driving 100 W linear amplifier which drove a 50 Hz timing motor. Line freq. control was more reliable than supplied crystal control of master clock.
     
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