4017 Help

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by zggtf211, Apr 22, 2007.

  1. zggtf211

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 22, 2007
    3
    0
    Hello. I just recently joined AAC and have been having trouble with the 555 clock and the 4017 decade counter. I need to know what the output voltage of the 4017 chip would be if the input is 5.5~6vdc. I am working on making a sign i got yesterday. I have the switch made and ready to go but I need the right resistor for it, a pcb screenshot or schematic for it, and to know how to get 2 4017 chips to work to count to 20. :p

    I know that my switch is going to work because i have been in the Computer controlled lighting area for about 4 months and this is the standard controller.
     
  2. thingmaker3

    Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
    5,072
    6
    Output of the 4017 will be either 0v or Vcc, depending on state.

    By "count to 20," do you mean to light 20 LEDs in sequence or some similar operation? If so, try tying pin 12 of each chip to pin 13 of the other. If not, then disregard.

    For the right resistor, and the pcb or schematic, we will need additional information from you.
     
  3. electronics wiz

    Active Member

    Mar 15, 2007
    54
    0
    There is a pin made just for that, that pin will go to the next counters clock input.
     
  4. zggtf211

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 22, 2007
    3
    0
    I would like to know what the power output of the count signal pins are.

    The receiver for the count signal is an opto isolator Found here. This keeps the 5.5~6vdc separate from the 120 volts on the other side; avoide a blown chip or all of them :)

    The power source will be as close to 5vdc as i can get it, I am still working on modifying my own power supply to work. I did a few tests and it showed an output of about 5.5ish.
     
  5. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
    15,815
    282
    Unless there is an overriding concern for Vcc being right at 5 VDC, then don't put too much energy into the supply voltage. 4000 series CMOS is happy with any voltage between 3 and 18 VDC.
     
  6. zggtf211

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 22, 2007
    3
    0
    The reason why it has to be as close to 5Vdc as possible is for the opto isolators because they are very picky on that kind of thing :D

    One other thing. I keep seeing this 1m Resistor in all of the schematics that i find, Could someone help me find one on Mouser.com so that i can order one or two with my next parts order?
     
  7. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
    15,815
    282
    Other than having very defininte current limits, you opto device should have no problems with the CMOS range of voltage. Use resistors to limit current to a safe level.
     
  8. thingmaker3

    Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
    5,072
    6
    1.67mW - Assuming a Farichild part with VDD of 5V at 25 degrees C. Assuming some other temperature or some other voltage or some other manufacturer... you're on your own.


    Under "Product Finder," click "Passive Components." Under "Passive Components," click "Resistors." Enter "1M" in the search field, check the "Stocked" option, and click "Search."
     
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