400 watts amplifier

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by whale, Dec 11, 2009.

  1. whale

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Dec 21, 2008
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    hie there,

    Iam designing a 400 watts , 13.52 Mhz radio frequency generator. now iam ready with my basic 13.56 Mhz oscillator circuit of 0.6 watts.
    next is to build a 400 watts amplifier at 13.56 Mhz frequency range.

    iam searching for such a circuit for very long days ,but i can't get it.
    at once i got a circuit from application notes of advance power technology.
    the circuit is good, but the MOSFET used is very strange(ARF440) .

    give me some idea to build the power amplifier.so that the parts used is easily available in market.
     
  2. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
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    There are no readily available components that will get you there. You'll shoot yer eye out kid.
     
  3. KL7AJ

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 4, 2008
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    When I worked in the UCLA plasma lab, we had an inductively coupled Plasma torch that could DISSOCIATE water...but we put in a LOT more power than we ever got out....about 150 KW!

    There is lots of high power plasma equipment at 13 MHZ, for industrial uses. This has NOTHING to do with the molecular resonance of water, however.


    eric
     
  4. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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    13.56MHz is also used in RFID applications - many other things, too.

    It would be nice to know what your application is.
     
  5. whale

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Dec 21, 2008
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    Iam using it to dissociate water .

    Can u tell me from where can i get the circuit?
     
  6. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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    It's really not worth the time and expense.

    You will consume a lot more energy disassociating water, which is an ash, into it's constituent parts (hydrogen, oxygen) than you will get back by combusting them.

    If you want to investigate a scientifically proven method for the efficient production of hydrogen, I encourage you to research methane reformation.
     
  7. whale

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Dec 21, 2008
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    whats that methane reformation?

    can u explain me?
     
  8. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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  9. whale

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Dec 21, 2008
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    thank u.

    i'll try it
     
  10. cumesoftware

    Senior Member

    Apr 27, 2007
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    Methane reformation is the process of dissociating methane into hydrogen. I don't see any energetic advantage if you want to use energy from hydrogen the same way you would use methane, by burning it. Besides, the reaction produces CO2.

    CH4 + 2 H2O = CO2 + 3 H2 (just for reference)
     
  11. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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    Currently, SMR (steam methane reformation) is the most efficient, scientifically proven method that is in widespread use.

    It isn't a pipe dream; it's a real process. There are no lurid claims of "over unity" production.

    There is no "magic" to it. It simply works. It is not 100% efficient, nor is anything else.
     
  12. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    I suspect a lot of this research will couple into the algae for biofuel. Now there is a solar panel! Cheap, relatively easy to maintain, and renewable.

    The 13.56 Mhz frequency was set aside by the FCC specifically for use in industrial processes. That particular part of the spectrum it is OK to splatter.
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2009
  13. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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    The algae for biofuel is interesting - and it'll help a lot with converting CO2 to oxygen.

    The fellow in question (forgot his name already) did actually use an RF transmitter to break down water into hydrogen & oxygen, and the resulting gas burned with a visible flame; color depended upon the impurities in the water. However, it (naturally) consumed more energy to break down the water than was returned by burning the hydrogen. He made no bones about that, and noted that it wouldn't be an energy source. He was just looking for another way to desalinate seawater, and accidentally discovered the phenomenon.

    Of course, the story has been much embellished by those who dream about "over unity" energy "creation".

    There's more energy radiating from the sun than we could ever possibly use; if only we'd harness it.
     
  14. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    Goes back to the basics, other than geothermal vents and volcanoes, all energy on this planet is fundamentally solar in one form or another.
     
  15. Duane P Wetick

    Active Member

    Apr 23, 2009
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    The sun certainly is an attractive energy source if only we could get the damnable efficiencies up; (< 15-20%). Solar power will be there some day, I believe, but it will be a long development road to get there.

    Cheers, DPW [ Spent years making heaters out of op-amps.]
     
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