4-wire

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by obert, Jan 22, 2014.

  1. obert

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 22, 2014
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    Replacing wall oven and service wiring has two reds, a white, and an insulated ground. Why are there two reds instead of one red and one black?
     
  2. inwo

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 7, 2013
    2,435
    315
    Standard color code is red, black, white.

    There is no compelling reason why it must be that way.

    If wiring is in conduit, electrician just had more red that day, or ran out of black.

    White and green and a few other colors are important by code. The two phase conductors are normally interchangeable and may be the same color.
     
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  3. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
    13,051
    3,244
    Assuming it's 220VAC then the two reds are both hot leads. For 110V you typically have one hot (black) and one neutral (white). In this case you will get 110V from either red to white.
     
  4. spinnaker

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 29, 2009
    4,887
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    If you need to ask that question then you probably shouldn't be messing with it. Some things like 220 are best left to a pro.
     
  5. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,565
    2,379
    +1 on possible reason.

    Also the code states that if a non-standard colour conductor is used, technically all relevant conductor termination points should be marked by tape indicating the correct or intended colour.
    Max.
     
  6. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,343
    6,828
    Maybe one of the reds has some black tape on it and you didn't know that's supposed to be a marker.
     
  7. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
    7,394
    1,606
    Nope, nothing beyond the National Electric Code, the local inspector, and your insurance company.
     
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