3-way Solenoid valve, :/

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Electronicsrookie, Dec 19, 2010.

  1. Electronicsrookie

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 28, 2010
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    Hi everyone,
    I have one water input(from tap), and two outputs. Water can flow through only one of these two outputs at a time. The first guess was a valve which, after days on the internet, was refined to "3 way solenoid valve".
    This valve is to be controlled by a 9v powered timer (a combo of the 4001 and the 4017) circuit.
    Is this feasible? Or, are there better options than the "3 way solenoid valve"?
    Thanks.
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2010
  2. jpanhalt

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 18, 2008
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    Can you give a link to the exact valve you reference?

    By 9V, do you mean a typical 9V battery? I doubt the solenoid would work with that battery, and if so, not for long. Why do you need a battery? Can you use a wall wart or other DC supply?

    John
     
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  3. Electronicsrookie

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 28, 2010
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    Hi John,
    thanks for replying. We don't have an exact model; we just know the name of the device. Actually, the main worry, is whether such a valve would perform the water deviation task. What is your thought on that one?
    About the power source,it's a very compact device, simple, so a battery seemed a better option; but, not an essential part of the design.
    Thanks again
     
  4. Electronicsrookie

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 28, 2010
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    Actually, if you people could recommend such valves...That would be life-saving!! :D
     
  5. jpanhalt

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 18, 2008
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    Not quite sure what you are trying to do. If I wanted to switch a water supply from one outlet to another, I would probably use a rotary valve like are available in most of our home building centers. If I wanted to make it wireless remote, then I would use a servo to actuate it. I suspect commercial units are available, but they are probably at least 10X as expensive. John
     
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  6. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    This is another case of, "How much current" as in, "how much water". It's hard to specify a valve if we don't know how big it is.
     
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  7. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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    Are there any part numbers on this valve, and/or a manufacturer's name?

    Three-port and 5-port valves are pretty common in industry for pneumatic and hydraulic controls. They aren't cheap.

    The solenoids can take a fair amount of power to keep energized. A 9v PP3 battery might last for a half-hour or so, if all of the planets were in line.

    Meanwhile, it would help a great deal if you told us more about your application - what is it that you're trying to do?
     
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  8. Electronicsrookie

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 28, 2010
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    Thanks a lot for your answers. So here's a little more detail on my project.

    Switch is on, continuity sensor detects that water is in, A 4001 drives the 4017, which after a certain time interval(3 sec on my model) sends a pulse to the..uh...valve. At this instant, water flow gets deviated to output 2. The whole process being powered by a 9v battery.
    Water input: simply connected to a tap. Output 1 is user. Output 2 is a container.
    @Alberto I think, Sir, that you have got my point; Two bistable on/off valves, more suitable for battery op. Could you suggest links/documentation for such valves? I think they would be ideal. :D

    Thanks a million.
     
  9. Electronicsrookie

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 28, 2010
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    @Alberto Thanks tons. :)
     
  10. Rbeckett

    Member

    Sep 3, 2010
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    Erookie, if you will take a look at the Toro and Rainbird line of lanscape and irrigation components you will find the solenoids and valves you need are available for low voltage systems. Many if not all of the commercial sprinkler and irrigation contractors use them all of the time with excellent results. You can control your flow any way you like on a timer or with a sensor if you need more sophistication. Hope this helps get ya going.
    Bob
     
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