253 volts?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by farrarcw, Sep 6, 2013.

  1. farrarcw

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 5, 2013
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    Not sure if this is the correct place for this or not, but I am trying to fix a salt generator in my pool, I changed the main circuit board, but two compents burned. The diagnostics states if you measure at both hot leads you should be between 209 and 241, but I am measuring 253. I am curious if this is cause for concern and if so, what I should do to remedy this.
     
  2. joeyd999

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jun 6, 2011
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    2,765
    253V in pool equipment? Ouch! I certainly hope that voltage is on the far side of an isolation transformer.

    In any case, there is probably nothing anyone here can help you with without more details (i.e. schematics, service manuals, photos, etc.).

    But if a range is given for particular measurement, then it is probably for a good reason. Yes, I'd say there is something wrong. What can you do to remedy it? Who knows.

    Edit: Be careful. You and your family's lives hang in the balance. A qualified technician may be in order here.
     
  3. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    Is this AC or DC, it could well be an internally generated high impedance signal required for the process and does not posses enough current capacity to be dangerous?
    You don't show your COO so we do not know what the service supply might be?

    Max.
     
  4. farrarcw

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 5, 2013
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    It is a 240 volt AC signal. It comes from a breaker box, through the pool equipment's timing circuit box, There is a transformer in the salt generator's box, but these lines are attached to the boards inputs before the transformer.
    Sorry for noob status, I am not sure what COO is, so I cant provide that until you tell me what it is.
     
  5. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    Country of Origin, if I guessed it correctly.
    Look at the blue bars at the top of the page, click on, "User CP" and type in something about where on the planet you are.
     
  6. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    Yes.

    OP, If you are getting 253v from a 240v supply, your service Co. does not regulate all that well by the look of it?
    It all depends on whether the unit is designed for ± % tolerance for the supply voltage?
    Max.
     
  7. studiot

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 9, 2007
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    How are you measuring this 253 volts?

    Is the supply also 253 volts elsewhere in the property and with a different meter?
     
  8. farrarcw

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 5, 2013
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    COO = DFW TX, USA.
    So my original thoughts is that power co is not doing a good job of regulating, but now I have been provided a set of tests to perform.
    I will test other circuits in the house with a different meter, and let you know.
    As far as the tolerances of the board, I dont have insight into this, but I can say this, I have been through 3 boards in 8 years, 2 of these in the last 45 days, so something has changed that is unapparent, I tend to think that this unregulated power is something new and is the culprit.
    I suppose that if it is this, I dont have a clue how to fix it.
     
  9. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    Sounds a possibility,!
    Get on the phone to the power service provider!
    Max.
     
  10. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    I have high voltage problems at my house, too. Besides measuring it at 249.9 volts in the course of doing some work, my UPS (for the computer) reports shutting off the outlet power 7 times in the last 12 weeks because of too high voltage.
     
  11. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    If you reckon the problem may be due to the voltage, If it is a fairly continuous or ongoing problem, you could obtain a small suitably sized Va transformer with ~ a 16v-20v secondary and set it up in the buck mode to reduce the supply on an ongoing basis.
    Max.
     
  12. SherpaDoug

    New Member

    Mar 7, 2013
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    The power company should supply you with power within spec. But if you must you could use a "buck transformer" to efficiently drop the voltage a small amount. It is basically an autotransformer of say 24V wired to subtract that 24V from the input thus turning your 253V to 239V.
     
  13. farrarcw

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 5, 2013
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    Thanks all for your help and suggestions here!
     
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