220V to 110V voltage converter trips on no load start up, 2 tries out of 3

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Edmund108, Jul 22, 2016.

  1. Edmund108

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 22, 2016
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    I am setting up a woodworking shop in the UK, which runs on 220V. I have multiple North American tools rated at 110V which are too expensive to replace. I am using three types of converters which I purchased as a job lot from an American who was repatriating to the US from the UK. See attached images.

    1. ELC T-3000 - I have two. They cold start more or less 1 try in 3, tripping the breaker in the other 2 attempts. Turned off for a few minutes (maybe up to an hour as I recall) seems to not affect successful starts thereafter.
    2. Simran THG-2000 - I have two. One needs a fuse receptacle replaced inside the body of the transformer, per images. Is this an adventurous consumer replaceable part? Any ideas? The other starts every time.
    3. MW2P200 (MW is the manufacturer I believe). I have two. They both start every time.

    I have read that voltage surge can trip breakers with these devices, however it is ONLY the ELC-3000 transformers which do so in this case. They are being powered by one breaker at this time, per image attached. I am being careful to not overload the circuit, naturally.

    One suggested remedy is to leave the offending transformer permanently on, once it starts successfully. This seems unsafe in principle - ?? Can any kind person suggest a reasonable workaround here, which does not involve a degree in electronics, Screen Shot 2016-07-22 at 2.37.06 PM.png Screen Shot 2016-07-22 at 2.36.26 PM.png Screen Shot 2016-07-22 at 2.36.26 PM.png Screen Shot 2016-07-22 at 2.36.05 PM.png Screen Shot 2016-07-22 at 2.37.06 PM.png Screen Shot 2016-07-22 at 2.36.26 PM.png Screen Shot 2016-07-22 at 2.36.05 PM.png Screen Shot 2016-07-22 at 2.37.06 PM.png Screen Shot 2016-07-22 at 2.36.26 PM.png Screen Shot 2016-07-22 at 2.36.05 PM.png or of risk?

    Many thanks in advance, Edmund
     
  2. AlbertHall

    Well-Known Member

    Jun 4, 2014
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    Which breaker trips, on the transformer or on your mains distribution panel.
    If it is on your distribution panel, and it is the 3kW units which trip it, then I suspect that it is the surge current which the transformers draw causing the problem.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inrush_current

    In that case you might use a slower or higher rated breaker but obviously that might be undesirable.
    Otherwise you might be able to use some sort of slow start device on the input to the transformer - like a 3kW 'dimmer' (I don't know whether such things are available). Or, again I don't whether suitable devices are available, an NTC thermistor.
     
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  3. Edmund108

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 22, 2016
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    Thanks Albert, It's the breaker panel breaker which trips. Slow start breaker would seem to make sense there. Before I drop the money though, I would like to hold out for anyone who may know for sure how this issue can be resolved??
     
  4. tcmtech

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 4, 2013
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    What is the input breakers amp rating?

    A simple startup inrush current limiter would be to put a higher wattage light bulb in series with the transformer unit with a manual switch that you close that shorts the power across the light bulb to full on a second or so after the transformer has powered up and the bulb dims down.
     
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  5. Edmund108

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 22, 2016
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    Thanks, tcmtech. I believe it's 16 amp, per the image here. Can you explain your suggestion in another way, as I do not see what you have in mind. Perhaps a schematic would be possible, if it's not too much trouble?
     
  6. Alec_t

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 17, 2013
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  7. tcmtech

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 4, 2013
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    Live power line --> light bulb --> transformer input lead. Then a switch across the lightbulb that gives the transformer full power by shorting the two wires going in and out of the light bulb together.

    I can't make it any simpler.
     
  8. Dodgydave

    Distinguished Member

    Jun 22, 2012
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    Last edited: Jul 25, 2016
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