2-to-1 multiplexer with discrete components?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by autorelease, Apr 1, 2010.

  1. autorelease

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jan 26, 2009
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    I'm currently designing a circuit that uses only one bit of a 74HC157 quad 2-to-1 multiplexer, like so:
    [​IMG]

    However, I'd like to get rid of this chip. Since the B input can be tristated (it's coming from a latch), I was wondering if I could set it up like this:
    [​IMG]
    I've seen this circuit used before, and it seems to do the right thing in Falstad's Java simulator, but I'm curious about a couple things. Wouldn't current actually flow back into A or B when B is enabled? Can they tolerate this? (A and B are both outputs from other 74HC-series ICs) Would I need diodes? How big should the resistor be?
     
  2. Ron H

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 14, 2005
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    What is the part number of the tristate circuit?
     
  3. autorelease

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jan 26, 2009
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    The tristate circuit is part of a 74HC573. (B is coming from one of the outputs, and S is the input to ~OE)

    Can a few microamps of current flowing into an output pin damage the chip?
     
  4. Ron H

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 14, 2005
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    With a 5V supply, you can use a resistor as low as 1k (≈5mA) in your mux circuit and still get good logic levels at the output, and it will not damage anything. See the HC573 datasheet and look under Static Characteristics. You will find that, when vcc=4.5, you can drive up to ±6mA, so 1k is a conservative value. Higher resistor values will result in slower rise/fall times and more delay.
    One disadvantage is that the resistor will draw current from Vcc even under static conditions if A and B are opposite logic levels. This won't happen with a CMOS mux.
     
  5. autorelease

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jan 26, 2009
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    Thanks, Ron. I'm more concerned with minimizing board real estate than static current draw, since I'm already using some old chips that draw plenty of current. Still, I'll do some experiments to see how large I can make the resistors.
     
  6. autorelease

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Jan 26, 2009
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    Ah, I understand the situation better now. (It's been a while since my last electronics class...). An IC output pin is capable of sourcing and sinking current. I just have to pick a resistor that keeps source/sink current sufficiently low. However, it looks like this might make the signal delay too long, so I'll probably just use the CMOS mux.
     
  7. Ron H

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 14, 2005
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    Unless you are running at a high clock rate, the technique should work.
    As an alternative, you can make a single 2-1 mux from a quad NAND package, but it will simply replace a 16 pin package with a 14 pin pkg.
     
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