2-gang box to provide both timer and remote switch control to a device

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by arjaygee, Oct 25, 2014.

  1. arjaygee

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 25, 2014
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    0
    Hi all,

    I apologize ahead for all the words. Just want to make sure there's enough context to understand what I'm doing.

    I currently have a hot water recirculator installed in my home (provides quick hot water to faucets far from water heater). My plan is to maximize energy efficiency of this system by building a basic circuit that provides both a timer capability (e.g. turns recirculator on in morning for a few hours to handle showers, etc.), and a remote switch for ad hoc on/off use during the day. The on/off switch is actually a remote switch that triggers a programmable countdown timer. So, if I want to plan to turn the dishwasher on, I would simply push the remote switch in the kitchen to turn on the recirculator for, say 1 hour. I purchased a Skylink PA-318 as the remote switch. The challenge in this seemingly simple combo of capabilities is that the timer must always have power (to keep time), and the remote switch can't be inline with the timer because it would only work in periods when I program the timer to be on. So, both the output of the timer and switch need to come together. The attached diagram of this design shows these outputs being tied together on a common outlet. My concern with this is when the remote switch is pushed, it causes 120V applied at the output of the timer. Conversely, when the timer goes on, 120V is applied to the output of the remote timer unit. Will this be a problem with either the timer or switch?

    Does this design seem okay or will the thing catch on fire the moment I press the remote button? Any thoughts, questions or concerns with how I would have this wired?

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. arjaygee

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 25, 2014
    3
    0
    Oh, one quick note of clarification. The attached diagram shows a timer directly on the recirculator (came as part of the unit). With my design, I would just have this set to always on.
     
  3. MikeML

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 2, 2009
    5,450
    1,066
    i went you one better. I bought an inexpensive temperature controller on fleabay and rigged it to shut off the pump when the temperature of the return loop water gets to ~45degC. I used one of the Harbor Freight Electronic timers for the morning/evening programming...

    You will need to put a check valve into the return loop just where the cool water goes into the hot water tank.

    I dont have time to comment on your wiring right now...
     
  4. arjaygee

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 25, 2014
    3
    0
    So, anyone have thoughts on if this design seems reasonable or suggestions on what might need to be done to make it work?
     
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