165v for halogen light - Is this normal voltage for halogen and how do I get 165?

Discussion in 'Power Electronics' started by RogueRose, Jul 14, 2016.

  1. RogueRose

    Thread Starter Member

    Oct 10, 2014
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    I have a 1500w halogen that I wanted to try out on a dimmer but I don't know how to get 165v. The bulb has no instructions and is a T3 style and says Bron Tech but searches yield nothing.

    Any ideas on how to use this bulb"
     
  2. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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    I would suggest slapping one into a 120VAC outlet or, if you don't have that, slapping two in series into a 240VAC supply.

    165V is a strange number but very close to the peak voltage of a 120VAC supply.
     
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  3. benta

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    Dec 7, 2015
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    1500 W T3? Really? Or do you mean 150 W?
     
  4. RogueRose

    Thread Starter Member

    Oct 10, 2014
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    1500 watt. I was surprised when I found it.
     
  5. GopherT

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  6. RogueRose

    Thread Starter Member

    Oct 10, 2014
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    Bulb - looks just about exactly like this one:
    [​IMG]

    But instead of them being $5-14 each, I found them for $.20 each.... and they have cases of broken ones and I was wondering what the inner metal part is and if it could be used in custom glass blown bulbs like back in the Edison days when bulbs never died...

    I was wondering if this could be run on rectified DC from 120AC. Isn't there something like a 1.4141 conversion rate from AC to DC rectification? 120 * 1.4141 would give just above 165v
     
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  7. djsfantasi

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    Apr 11, 2010
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    That looks like the heater in my toaster oven.
     
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  8. BR-549

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    Sep 22, 2013
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    I have changed that type before. Be sure to use gloves. Any finger prints left on the bulb, will burn the bulb out.
    I always hated those things.
     
  9. KeepItSimpleStupid

    Well-Known Member

    Mar 4, 2014
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    Yep, no fingerprints.

    In order for the Halogen cycle to work the bulb has to be at a specific voltage. A lower voltage just reduces the lifetime. So, 120 V works for testing.

    In a lab setup we used water cooled lamp housing and reflector that used that sort of bulb for IR heating, but it gave off lots of visible light.

    In another set-up we used quartz heating elements with wire leads.

    Arc lamps do have a polarity and not marked.

    let's say some ideas:
    It's a medical illumination and the 60 Hz ripple interferes with some other instrument. Rectifying the mains is a simple way of reducing the ripple.

    Or
    the bulb works better with DC and a particular orientation because of say gravity.
     
  10. GopherT

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    Nov 23, 2012
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    What is the science around that?
     
  11. BR-549

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    Sep 22, 2013
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    It's called the quantum tunneling effect. If a gravity wave is emitted while the light is on, it will blow.

    This is where experience comes in. There is an lot more to changing a light bulb than one would think.
     
  12. KeepItSimpleStupid

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    Mar 4, 2014
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    The darn light bulb had to replace once a year or every 1000 hours of operation, was about an hour's worth of work. Thick clothing, face shield and gloves was part of the personnel protective equipment. Had to eliminate people traffic. Had to inform someone that I was changing the bulb. The lamp pressure was about 15 atmospheres. So, absolutely no fingerprints; don't install it upside down and don't drop it!

    Voltage(operating): 22 V at 45 A; 1000 W nominal
    Voltage(starting): 40 kV
     
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  13. BR-549

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    Sep 22, 2013
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    Pain in the ass.
     
  14. GopherT

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    Yup, we had the same rules for a Xenon arc lamp. I assume yours was a Xenon arc lamp as well if it needed 40kV to start. About three years after I moved on I returned for a meeting and ask, who was currently changing the bulbs. A 3rd year grad student said he did it. I started discussing the procedure with him. He looked at me like I had two heads. He said he just pulled it out of the box and put it in. He replaced it at 150% of expected bulb life.

    So, I have a strong feeling there is a nice combination of coincidence and wives tales about it. No science that I have been able to find.
     
  15. KeepItSimpleStupid

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  16. BR-549

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    Sep 22, 2013
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    I was told by an engineer it was the finger oil. The oil absorbs heat and has the duration for a very hot spot. Bing.
     
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  17. GopherT

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    Yes, this is the wives tail. Bing.
     
  18. SLK001

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    Nov 29, 2011
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    No "wives tail". The oil in your fingers will etch the quartz tube under the intense heat. This in turn creates a hotspot where heat builds up and shortens the life of the bulb. Maybe your grad student had enough sense to wear gloves.
     
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  19. BR-549

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    Sep 22, 2013
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    I'm not even sure if the the same type we had. It was a terrible chore for the electricians. They always let the new guy change them, and never mentioned the finger warning. ha ha
     
  20. GopherT

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    No wives tail? You just recited something that makes no sense to me. A mineral glass, quartz, etched by skin oil? I would like to see that experiment. Interesting that there is no solid science anywhere on this.
     
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