14W Amplifier

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by ElectroNewbie, Nov 27, 2011.

  1. ElectroNewbie

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 23, 2011
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    I'm making an 14W amplifier, I've etched my circuit up and now I'm a little confused on how to place everything in my project box. I've attached the circuit and components I have. I'm not sure if I bought the right things or not if someone can tell me if its the right stuff.

    Thank you!
     
  2. ifixit

    Distinguished Member

    Nov 20, 2008
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    Here is a jay peg view...
     
  3. paulktreg

    Distinguished Member

    Jun 2, 2008
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    I presume you are using the 4mm binding posts for supply with a slide switch as an on/off switch and a fuse in series with your positive supply for added safety? Your speaker connector looks fine but what is the knob for? Are you fitting the 22k volume pot shown dotted? You have a double phono connector, is this for the input because you'll just need one for this project.

    Make sure you have mounting holes in your printed circuit board and go for it. If this is your first project then it's trail and error really when putting things together but you'll find it gets far easier with experience.
     
  4. ElectroNewbie

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 23, 2011
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    Yes, I'll be adding the switch and fuse in series for the added safety. I incorporated the 22k into my board already. The 4mm binding posts meaning the banana jacks? For the input will I have to switch it out for an single connector? I'm not sure how to connect the switch since there's 3 connections on the back.
    This is my first project so I'm taking extra precaution before I start soldering things together.
    Thank you though!
     
  5. bountyhunter

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 7, 2009
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    The TDA2030 will need a decent heatsink.
     
  6. ElectroNewbie

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 23, 2011
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    Is there a special procedure on adding the heatsink or do I just screw it to the TDA? And does it matter what kind of heatsink I have?
     
  7. bountyhunter

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 7, 2009
    2,498
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    Attach with screw, but the tab of the IC is the most negative potential in the circuit (ground in your design). Make sure the heatsink does not short out to anything at another potential. The type you need depends on how much power dissipation. Operating at higher power requires a large heatsink, but music or audio typically is a lower average power.
     
  8. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
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    Is your speaker 8 ohms? Will it survive 14W?
    Is your power supply 36V at about 1A?
     
  9. thatoneguy

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2009
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    Where does the power supply connect, and the schematic for it?
     
  10. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
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    +36V connects to "+Vs" and 0V connects to ground on the schematic.
    The power supply is simple and is shown on the datasheet for the TDA2030A (maybe the TDA2030 without the "A" is not made anymore).
     
  11. Yako

    New Member

    Nov 24, 2011
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    If you want something a bit more elaborate, which will attribute to performance gains of the amp; since it only requires 1 amp of current, then a linear voltage regulator with a series pass transistor could be used.

    It will sound better.
     
  12. Yako

    New Member

    Nov 24, 2011
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    If you like lots of BOOM, BOOM bass type music as I do at high volume, then a regulated supply is the go, because these really low frequencies draw the most surges from the supply. Also enure for plenty of de-coupling around the circuit with large capacitors on the rectifier side. Watchout for earth loops in the circuit which WILL induce pickup noise. Sounds terrible.
     
  13. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
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    You do not get much BOOM, BOOM high power bass with this weak little 14W amplifier.
     
  14. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
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    The power supply for an audio power amp does not require to be voltage regulated. The quality of the sound will actually improve (like tube amps) with an unregulated power supply. (I play bass with a 200W amp).
     
  15. Yako

    New Member

    Nov 24, 2011
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    Do you agree that technically you will get better results with a regulated supply?
     
  16. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
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    No.
    If the power supply can power the amplifier continuously at full power at the lowest frequency you play then an unregulated power supply is fine.

    The amplifier will be able to produce slightly more power for peaks with an unregulated power supply but usually the amplifier is not played at "full blast" so you will not notice.

    Most amplifiers reject hum from an unregulated supply so regulation is not needed.
     
  17. Yako

    New Member

    Nov 24, 2011
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    No need to have regulated rails for the pre-amp too?
     
  18. Yako

    New Member

    Nov 24, 2011
    245
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    If it is an IC like this yeah.

    This amp is class AB right?
     
  19. thatoneguy

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2009
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    My bad. Thought the full doc was converted in 2nd post.
     
  20. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
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    Some do, some don't.

    Correct.
    If it is class-A then it will get too hot all the time even when it is not playing.
    If it is class-B then it will have horrible crossover distortion.
    If it is class-C then it will have horrible distortion.
    If it is class-D then it would be new, cool and probably be in a surface-mount tiny case.
     
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