12vdc -> 24vdc booster ->24vdc VSD -> 24vdc Motor?

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by fluxcapacitor, Sep 12, 2011.

  1. fluxcapacitor

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 12, 2011
    3
    0
    Hello, My question is, can I connect :
    • 12v battery to:
    • 12v-> 24v 150w step up converter/booster to:
    • 24v dc motor speed controller to drive:
    • Permanent mag 150w 12/24v DC motor?
    My current data is 9Amp DC @ 12vdc no load, up to 16A full load

    What will be my input current if I use the booster? + 10%? , will the output current @ 24vDC be less @ 150w eg 6.25A?

    The booster & DC motor drive are on ebay, from China any feedback?

    What would be your main concern /s with the above application?

    The main purpose of this is only to increase the output speed of the motor.

    Any help would be well appreciated.
    Thankyou
     
  2. fluxcapacitor

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 12, 2011
    3
    0
  3. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
    1,728
    The DC-DC converter you're considering won't be able to handle the current requirement when the motor is under load even at 12v; 12v*16A = 192 Watts.

    You'd probably need a 800W or greater supply.
     
  4. fluxcapacitor

    Thread Starter New Member

    Sep 12, 2011
    3
    0
    Thankyou SgtWookie,

    So our main concern would be the capacity of the DC-DC converter.

    I understand that bigger is better for may reasons but my application does not need to be continuously rated.

    It will only run for about 20-30 sec @ no load (only g/box) with 24v supply. I can use relays to change direction and connect 12v direct from the battery to run the motor under load. (in the other direction)

    Im trying to speed up the loose return of a rope/sling on a conveyer.

    Would a 360W cope? or burn in 10sec?

    DC/DC Converter Regulator 12V Step Up to 24V – 15A 360W
     
  5. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
    1,728
    When you first apply power to the motor, it will draw as much current as if the rotor were locked for a few moments. As the rotor gains RPMs, the load current will decrease. However, I have no way of knowing how that supply will react with such an overload. It may completely shut down, or it might "crowbar" the output until the load decreases, or do something else. The advertisement claims that it's protected against overload/over current and that it will recover automatically, but doesn't say what actually happens to the output when it's overloaded.
     
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