12v voltage regulator

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by robinsph, Aug 14, 2012.

  1. robinsph

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 12, 2012
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  2. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
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    What is the output of your LPF? What regulator are you planning to use? How much total current through the regulator?

    In general terms: As long as the supply - when loaded - stays above 12V plus the regulator's dropout, and below the safe max for the regulator, then the regulator should handle the fluctuating supply.
     
  3. robinsph

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 12, 2012
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  4. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
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    There are almost NO SPECS for those LED strips.
    Do they have built-in current-limiting resistors?

    If they have resistors then what is the minimum and maximum operating voltage?

    You need 12V plus or minus an unknown tolerance. Your 15V might burn them out.
    Your lowpass filter has a series resistance that might not pass the required current.
     
  5. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
    12,156
    3,063
    That's a handy little board for the price, but it may not be what you need.

    What is your power source, and why is there a low pass filter in between it and the regulator?

    Backing up, you need to know the properties of you power supply and your load, in terms of voltage and current, and then design something to mate them up.

    So far, we know nothing about either end except that those LEDs appear to be meant for a standard 12v computer power supply. But that's a guess and just not enough. The website does say "TriBright uses independent ICs to power each LED". That's a good sign.
    [edit] I see elsewhere on their site that the LEDs are 0.24W each. That means they need 20mA each at 12v. How many do you want to light up?
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2012
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