100 Watt LEDs?

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Metalmann, Dec 24, 2012.

  1. Metalmann

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Dec 8, 2012
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    Good day, gentlemen; first time poster. Great site!:cool:

    I was wondering about this LED for lighting/worklights--for machine tools, lathe, mill, drill press, grinders, etc.

    I tried to do a search, but didn't find anything about this LED.:


    http://www.ebay.com/itm/1pc-100Watt...291&pid=100028&prg=1009&rk=2&sd=230843927486&

    Has anyone tried this application?

    I bet a guy could make a mint, if he could figure out a way to light whole machine shops. A lot of shops were severely lacking in lighting.

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. vrainom

    Member

    Sep 8, 2011
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    I've used a 10w led as a worklight for well over a year in a workbench lamp and it's awesome. I used an old pentium cpu heatsink with fan to keep it cool and it barely gets warm, which I think is the key to make it last long.

    100w, though, I think is a lot of heat to dissipate and a lot, and I mean a lot, of light. I haven't actually seen these in action, but as a reference, check the photos for the 30w led version at http://club.dx.com/reviews/photos/47262. Especially impressive is the before and after pics of the ceiling fan light.
     
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  3. KMoffett

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 19, 2007
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    Are you looking for a 100W LED...or an LED lamp with the light output equal to a 100W incandescent bulb?

    Ken
     
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  4. Metalmann

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Dec 8, 2012
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    Actually, I've been thinking that here should be some way, to create hanging, LEDs; to replace older fluorescent fixtures.

    Maybe build a four, or eight foot long, LED fixture of some sort.

    There is a lot that I don't know about LEDs, but I'm learning lots from this forum.;)

    I don't really understand enough about this, but I bought a few 10 Watt LEDs to experiment with.....

    There must be some way to do what I want.:confused::cool::confused:
     
  5. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
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    Why would anybody buy this no-name-brand high power (?) LED?

    Buy parts made by a manufacturer you know and you trust.
     
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  6. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    Start with the math. 6500 Kelvin color temperature, 2325 lumens, for the 4 foot fluorescent tubes in a box at my house.

    32-36V at 3 to 3.5 amps, 6,000 to 6,500 Kelvin on those chinese LEDs. That means they burn 100 watts of power. ($17.68 plus shipping, plus driver, plus cooling.) I don't see a lumen level on the 100 Watt LEDs. The alleged 50 watt LEDs are listed as 4600 to 4900 lumens.

    It looks like the 50W version can substitute for a pair of 40 watt fluorescent tubes.
    The cooling will either require more power for a fan or some excellent metal for a heat sink. Waste some power in the driver circuit and I'm not getting a salivate response. I think we're going to have to wait a while longer for LED technology to beat fluorescent tubes by enough to justify destroying millions of fluorescent fixtures hanging in buildings all over America.

    Then there is the fact that a 100 watt LED can be considered as a "point" source. It just will not pretend to be an 8 foot long light bulb. I think a clear plastic rod with etched exterior will distribute the light in a way that is very similar to a standard fluorescent tube, but it is another expense to be considered.

    A good application, as is, would be high ceiling luminaires, or as street lights. A point source can work in those conditions. Still, they are about, "break even" for efficiency right now.
     
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  7. takao21203

    Distinguished Member

    Apr 28, 2012
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    These white LEDs are not bad.

    I just received some 30W LEDs today.

    Same voltage, I run them at 33.5 volts.

    The brightness is very good, and the heat developement is not too much.

    Sure for a 100W LED, you have more than 3x the amount of heat!

    I have glued the LED to a Pentium II heatsink (special silicone cement), and the same for the fan on the backside.

    For 100W you need a larger fan, the LED maybe won't even fit on a Pentium II heatsink.

    But be careful, voltages are not exactly the same for all brands, and heat developement does not scale properly. It is different for each type of LED!

    In one of the photo's you see a 3W LED, a 10W LED, and a 30W LED.
    All these have metal pads, and need heat conducting grease.

    In the other photo's you see the 30W LED lamp, as well the power supply circuit.

    In one photo you see the light on the wall, 3 metres distance.

    If you want to use power LEDs in a workshop, many smaller LEDs would be better than one large LED.

    a 100W LED is a challenge if you never have used power LEDs.
     
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  8. Metalmann

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Dec 8, 2012
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    Well, so far; I've bought five and they all work as expected.

    Maybe the American distributors are getting theirs, at the same location.:confused:;)
     
  9. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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    I've got 2 (50W) and know hundreds of people that are using them (from 10W to 250W).. All with NO issues.

    I say the same thing about people that pay more for a product just because of its well known brand name only. But what works works..
    China/Taiwan/etc.. quality is getting better/better by the day. They first started selling anything the could make regardless of quality.. Now they are slowly learning you won't sell nearly as many when they are breaking all the time,etc... The finally learned that "bad words/reviews" travel FAST.

    As for making fixtures/making millions... People are already trying.. We have already had the salesmen come in and try to sell us on the ROI of replacing our metal halide high bay lighting with LED "equivalents".. The problem is that these idiots are trying to make their millions too quickly with this "LED" revolution of a world we are in now.. I've never seen more idiots trying to say that a ROI of 15 years is acceptable and a reason to change now.. The price for "well known branded" fixtures is outrageous. $$$

    quick example of why I bought/built one.. I have a saltwater reef tank.. A "Commercial/branded" 50W LED fixture is $599 USD.. I built mine for $100. (oh and for the size of my tank I will need 4.. So $2400 for off-the-shelf or $400 DIY..)
     
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  10. takao21203

    Distinguished Member

    Apr 28, 2012
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    I have built a 30W lamp for really less than 10$.

    It has a cooling fan spinning all the time, and no enclosure.
    But 30 cents/Watt is not bad.
     
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  11. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
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    Exactly right. Only now are LEDs becoming available that might surpass the lumens per watt efficiency of fluorescent tubes, end-to-end including the driver, and it's only the top-tier manufacturers like Cree that offer them. Older technology falls far short and costs more capital to install, giving little incentive to switch.

    LEDs have a lot of advantages, but bang for the buck, lumens per watt hasn't been one of those advantages. They do appear to have a brighter future for continued improvement, though. Maybe 2013 will be the breakout year.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2013
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  12. takao21203

    Distinguished Member

    Apr 28, 2012
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    CFLs and fluorescents are less effective than LEDs.

    They produce a lot of heat.
    They have a useful service life of maybe one year 24/7.
    They will fail prematurely in hot environments.

    Only HPS lamps are more effective than LEDs.

    a 30W LED lamp is much smaller than a 30W CFL.
    It does not need high-voltage socket/wires as well.

    If I compare CFL and LED technology for my own use, it is really worlds apart. I would not consider any CFL for just a minute.
     
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  13. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
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    Not true yet. Not by the usual standard of light-per-dollar for commercially available solutions, except where changing a bulb has such a high cost that service life trumps all other concerns.

    CFLs will disappear from the market in seconds if/when LEDs become more cost-effective, since I don't think anyone especially likes CFLs, for the reasons you've noted. And the slow start-up. Oh yeah, and the hazmat crew you have to call if you break one. ;)
     
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  14. takao21203

    Distinguished Member

    Apr 28, 2012
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    I have a 10W LED inside my computer case. All my desk is flooded with light.

    Imagine to have a 220V CFL inside the PC case. A big mess for the high voltage wire + socket + lamp suspension.

    The Cooler + LED is simply screwed on the underside of perforated ventilation holes.

    Switch is also only for 12 volts.
     
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  15. PatM

    Active Member

    Dec 31, 2010
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    I have been running 100W 130V incandescent lamps at 120V.
    At this lower voltage the lamp is rated at 14000 hours.
    A lot cheaper than using the LED's
     
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  16. takao21203

    Distinguished Member

    Apr 28, 2012
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    Good one.

    One could do the same with LEDs :)

    A 10W white LED costs about $2 to $2.50 as of 2013.
     
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  17. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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    Today, on the saltwater message board I visit.. A preschool teacher had a fish tank in the classroom with a 30W LED floodlight/housing from China over it.. Xmas eve night it caught fire causing $500,000+ in damage to the school.. (mostly from the flood from the sprinkler system actually) Destroyed 8 classrooms in that sprinkler zone.
     
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  18. takao21203

    Distinguished Member

    Apr 28, 2012
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    was it sold to use it for fishtank?

    if ppl dont apply common sense, almost everything can cause a fire.

    To actually cause a fire you need about at least 350C.

    Any electronic circuit will desolder itself at 200C. Before of that, most components will fail.

    It is rare that electronics really burst into flames.

    If you force an outdoors lamp into a small enclosure, this is not a good idea.

    What will happen to my lamps if the fan fails?

    -The LEDs may burn out from heat stress.
    -As I use lead solder, the fly wires will desolder themselves.

    Guess what. Some electrical fires are actually insurance ripoff's.

    It is really difficult to cause a fire with electric appliances, even if you desperately wanted to on purpose.

    Sometimes I light cigarettes with my soldering iron.

    I have to set it to max. temp., and really carbonize the tobaccoo, and suck a lot of air through it.

    So as a bit of a pyromaniac, I know pretty well how things burn.
     
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  19. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
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    You do know there's lead on the end of your iron, right? :(
     
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  20. takao21203

    Distinguished Member

    Apr 28, 2012
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    Haha, yes, tons of lead. But I don't use the tin coated top of the tip. I use the top of the tip holder, where the tip is really thick.

    I don't do it often, just now and then, when I can't find matches or a lighter.
     
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