1 acv to 10 acv step up

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by aphinney, Mar 12, 2009.

  1. aphinney

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 12, 2009
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    ok guys..looking to build a 1 to 10 acv step up. now i do not wanna do a transformer because of the lost over the transformer. here is the situation. we have a pc based dmm. it has a 10 acv max rating on it. we want to make this be 100acv max. so we are needing to build a 1 to 10 ratio acv step up. how can i do this. and once we get this built we are wanting to do a 1 to 10 ratio acv step up. thanx for the quick reply..
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2009
  2. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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    Wait - you mean that you want a 10:1 reduction in voltage, right?

    If your PC based DMM only has a 10VAC max rating and you want to be able to measure 100VAC, then you'll need to scale the voltage down, not an increase in voltage.

    The most noise-free way to do that would be to use a 10:1 O-scope probe. You can buy them for around $10 on Ebay.

    If you're thinking of measuring any mains voltages though, you must use a transformer.
     
  3. thingmaker3

    Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
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    The most efficient, lowest loss method of converting between AC levels is the transformer.
     
  4. aphinney

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 12, 2009
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    yes sorry...im doin 100 things at once..yes i need a 10:1...so i can use a 10x prob wire into the pc based dmm leads and should work ? cause idk how that could work but i could be wrong
     
  5. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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    O-scope probe leads have a BNC male (coaxial bayonet) base. You would need a BNC female connector to banana plugs (or whatever your DMM connections are) or a "BNC female breakout".

    Sorry, I forget that not everyone has those kinds of things lying around in boxes. :rolleyes:

    If you're only going to be measuring 50Hz to 60Hz VAC, your safe and easy solution will be a transformer. However, if you're going to be measuring other frequency VAC, you'll need a different approach.
     
  6. aphinney

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 12, 2009
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    well we are goin to need to be able to measure from 20Hz to 100Hz VAC
     
  7. aphinney

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 12, 2009
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    so what are my options now...if i can get the probe to work...shouldnt have a problem with those freq should i ?
     
  8. thingmaker3

    Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
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    For measuring those frequencies, the 10:1 probe is a good choice.
     
  9. aphinney

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 12, 2009
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    thanks guys
     
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