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Embedded Systems and Microcontrollers Discussion forum for projects and working with embedded systems and microcontrollers (FPGAs, PICs, AVRs). Get help with hardware issues and embedded programming.

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  #1  
Old 01-23-2008, 02:35 AM
Rodents210 Rodents210 is offline
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Default Microcontroller Chips -- "Homemade" USB Joystick


I've gotten really into the concept of using my old gaming equipment to use with my PC via USB. I've done another thing as well in this respect, but with a Parallel port, and admittedly I'm not the best at understanding circuitry and whatnot, and my circuit failed. I think I damaged the transistor during soldering, or misplaced my ground wire, missed the connectors on the memory card, or something else.

Anyway, I have done some research on other things, and have found some specific diagrams and tutorials on how to connect NES controllers, N64 controllers, and SNES controllers through USB, but what I haven't been able to figure out is the above circuit. It's from the following site:

http://www.zen35383.zen.co.uk/stnield/usbpads.htm

Admittedly, I am new to this, and I've read tons of things, but I don't think I'm confident enough to even consider trying this without the opinion of someone with some more experience...

So I'm guessing that I need a CY7C63000A-PC or CY7C63001A-WC chip to complete this project, and I need a programmer thing to tell it how to communicate through the USB port? I've never really done that, and I don't know my ankle from my elbow in that, I'm afraid.

Now, brace yourself for a stupid question. Yes, I realize I probably sound like an idiot, but I have a friend who is quite experienced at programming in C. Now I doubt the microcontroller would be programmed in C, C++, etc, but would his experience in those languages make him at all suited to help me with this?

Also, I can get diodes, resistors, etc from RatShack (RadioShack), but I don't think they sell Microcontrollers or Male USB Plugs?

I admit I'm pretty talented with computer software and installing hardware, but when it comes down to the raw circuitry I'm at a loss. I really want to strengthen myself in this area and get the satisfaction of making my own controller instead of buying one of those look-alike, similar controllers from the local shop. I also realize this stuff may be beyond me at the moment (I almost failed circuitry back in 8th-grade shop class, and those chips were pre-programmed!), but I also say that I have a very hard time starting with the basics, and if you're willing to tolerate me, this is where I'd like to start.

I'm not asking for a complete breakdown of everything I need to do; I understand diodes, resistors and whatnot (at least, I'm pretty sure I do). It's just some of the more complicated and unclear stuff that I want help with.

I hope I've been clear enough, and I hope you guys won't be too harsh on the new guy. I've read the posting guidelines and think I've covered all the bases for posting on your forum. Lastly, I hope this, which is making out to be a wall of text, doesn't hurt your eyes to look at...

Thanks infinitely for any help you may offer me!
Rodents210
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  #2  
Old 02-20-2009, 03:48 PM
Sobe Sobe is offline
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Default

the diagram looks like a psx controller converter to usb. the big thing at the middle is a micro and its where u program all the things u want the thingy to do. knowing what type of micro it is u could know how much space you have for codes and alot more about what each input out put does.
that been said it doesnt seem well designed diagram as most designers write the item number on each part including the micro
you CAN program micros with C or c++. Most of the time what u wana use depends on micro ..

all this that was said is from a guy who started doing this about a month ago, i know most of the members here are happy to help you and know a hake alot more than me....
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Old 02-20-2009, 04:03 PM
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beenthere beenthere is offline
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There are alternatives to consider. Googling :usb joystick circuit" brings up many DIY projects. This one seems to be very capable - http://www.embedds.com/the-fun-way-t...-usb-joystick/.
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Old 05-13-2009, 02:43 AM
pclark pclark is offline
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Default Simple Circuit

One of the most used ways to create a usb interface is by using a PIC18F4550 chip from Microchip. You can sample these from them, can program them with ANSI c, and create a circuit with minimal components. See the link below for a simple circuit.

http://pwc.theclarkwebsite.com/PIC18F4550usb.php
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