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The Projects Forum Working on an electronics project and would like some suggestions, help or critiques? If you would like to comment or assist others with their projects, this is the place to do it.

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  #1  
Old 05-02-2012, 09:55 PM
liftupyourheads liftupyourheads is offline
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Default Need help wiring cord to a 1.5 hp 115/230 volt motor!

I am completely new to electronics. I am a knife maker and I burned out my original motor for my belt grinder so I ordered another from ebay. When it arrived I was dismayed to find that there was no power cord attached! I've discovered that this is typical, however I have no idea how to wire a cord up to it and I don't want to mess up my new motor.

I was told that I need to figure out whether I want to run it on 115 volts or 230 volts but I don't even know which of those I want...

If anyone can help that would be AWESOME! I need this machine so I can continue making knives.

I was also wondering if I could use the old power cord from my burned out grinder?

thank you!
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Old 05-02-2012, 10:42 PM
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What does the name plate on the old motor say? If it says 115/220 also, there should be a wiring diagram as part of the nameplate or under the cover where the cord goes in. How is the old motor wired?
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Old 05-02-2012, 11:01 PM
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Firstly, we'd better find out in which country you are living?
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Old 05-02-2012, 11:06 PM
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I'm guessing USA because he has 115 available.
and yes, you can use the old cord if it isn't brittle or chewed up.
and this isn't electronics per se, but us electronic guys know how to do it.

So...read the label or post a photo.
I'm also guessing that reading the label will show how to fix this right up.
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Old 05-02-2012, 11:46 PM
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greetings fellow bladesmith. I used a compressor motor for my belt grinder. Check it out. Won't be able to help you with yours until we see a pic of the nameplate.
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Old 05-03-2012, 12:31 AM
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Generally, you have 3 wires going to the motor for ac. A hot, a neutral, and a ground. Just follow the wires from the plug to the motor like you would with an electric laundry dryer, or other such 3 phase wired equipment. Then just change out each wire one at a time. The other way that is easy for non electrical types is to mark the wires as they correspond to the motor and old cable and just match them up. Voila! If that is too confusing I am sure there are many DIY sites that have pics.
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Old 05-03-2012, 12:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MBVet05 View Post
Generally, you have 3 wires going to the motor for ac. A hot, a neutral, and a ground. Just follow the wires from the plug to the motor like you would with an electric laundry dryer, or other such 3 phase wired equipment. Then just change out each wire one at a time. The other way that is easy for non electrical types is to mark the wires as they correspond to the motor and old cable and just match them up. Voila! If that is too confusing I am sure there are many DIY sites that have pics.
I can think of a few ways that can go wrong.
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Old 05-03-2012, 01:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MBVet05
Generally, you have 3 wires going to the motor for ac. A hot, a neutral, and a ground. Just follow the wires from the plug to the motor like you would with an electric laundry dryer, or other such 3 phase wired equipment. Then just change out each wire one at a time. The other way that is easy for non electrical types is to mark the wires as they correspond to the motor and old cable and just match them up. Voila! If that is too confusing I am sure there are many DIY sites that have pics.

I can think of a few ways that can go wrong.


Especially since this is single phase and not 3 phase and we still don't know if it is 115 or 220 volts!
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Old 05-03-2012, 05:03 AM
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Default Warning! This post contains extreme machine porn.

Quote:
Originally Posted by strantor View Post
greetings fellow bladesmith. I used a compressor motor for my belt grinder. Check it out. Won't be able to help you with yours until we see a pic of the nameplate.
This was enjoyable to watch because it's rare to have a face (in this case, a whole body) that to put on a handle. Jeff Foxworthy says there's a red neck in all of us just yearning to be set free.

Oh, you need one of these!

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...allery-153748/
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Old 05-04-2012, 12:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CDRIVE View Post
This was enjoyable to watch because it's rare to have a face (in this case, a whole body) that to put on a handle. Jeff Foxworthy says there's a red neck in all of us just yearning to be set free.

Oh, you need one of these!

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...allery-153748/
I'd love to have an old lathe! Even more, room for one. And yes, the redneck is strong with me.
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