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Old 05-26-2010, 01:33 AM
JR3300 JR3300 is offline
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Default Shocked by 277

Hello guys. Recently I was working on a project and was electricuted for 3 seconds of 277. It was extremely painful and, thank God, the breaker tripped knocking out 9 2*4 layin ceiling lights.
My question is what are some immediate symptoms and what can be some longterm effects?
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Old 05-26-2010, 01:41 AM
Bychon Bychon is offline
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You just changed from an electronic question to a medical question. Not being a doctor, I can only say that if you lived, your heart is still working, but you might have some effects caused by cooking nerves or muscles. Yes, they actually cook. If you have nerve symptoms, go see a real doctor! If you feel like you've been poisoned, that is a symptom of dead muscle tissue. Go see a real doctor.
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Old 05-26-2010, 01:44 AM
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BMorse BMorse is offline
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I haven't had any long term side effects and I have been electrocuted with up to 480 VAC...... the immediate side effects I am sure you already know from the pain.. do you have any burn marks where the power entered and exited??.. you were just lucky enough that it didn't hurt you more than what it did, this should be a lesson in working with AC power (or any other power source!), always make sure power is off before servicing any electrical appliance, even if it is just a light fixture.....



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Old 05-26-2010, 01:46 AM
JR3300 JR3300 is offline
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Thanks Bychon, the electricity conducted through a metal stud that I was pressing my chest up against. When I pushed my materials over these wires, left uncapped, fell onto the stud and proceeded to shock the living crap out of me.
I spoke breifly with some electricians today and they say that I may loose some taste and smell. My tongue has not felt the same since the shock and at times I have strange lower back pain...usually caused by heavy lifting but in this case more frequently...without heavy lifting since the shock.
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Old 05-26-2010, 01:50 AM
JR3300 JR3300 is offline
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No entry or exit wounds Bmorse, I was standing about 6 ft up on an 8 ft fiberglass ladder.
I've experienced 110, it felt like a squirel knarling on my finger while shaking its head. I've heard that 480 doesn't hold you but instead throws you, but I KNOW 277 holds you while it pulses through your body at incredible speeds. It is very painful and it makes you feel very small.
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Old 05-26-2010, 01:55 AM
JR3300 JR3300 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BMorse View Post
I haven't had any long term side effects and I have been electrocuted with up to 480 VAC...... the immediate side effects I am sure you already know from the pain.. do you have any burn marks where the power entered and exited??.. you were just lucky enough that it didn't hurt you more than what it did, this should be a lesson in working with AC power (or any other power source!), always make sure power is off before servicing any electrical appliance, even if it is just a light fixture.....




B. Morse
Lesson learned...believe me. The only problem is, I'm an HVAC guy, not an electrician. There was an electrician not even 10 ft away installing a wall plug who did see me and my partner go up to work and didn't bother to warn us of dangling wires, nor were any wirenuts placed over these wires.
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Old 05-26-2010, 02:06 AM
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You need to be examined by a doctor.

Chest electrocution can lead to pericardial "cooking".

The pericardium is the sack that surrounds your heart. If you have any burnt tissue that is in the process of dying, the pressures created in the sack during heart beats can lead to a rupture in the weakened tissue.

Three seconds is a very, very long time to be electrocuted.

The important thing is to get medical attention. As the tissue continues to breakdown, different chemicals can flood you system.

The pain in your back if most likely NOT muscular but renal.
As your kidneys will try to filter out the toxins produced by the damaged tissues.

I would urge you to stay completely hydrated and inspect your urine. If you notice a darker than normal color to your urine, time is of the essence.

If your back pain increases, or palpating the areas lead to tenderness, get moving.

It is very difficult to convince yourself that things are bad because you see nothing.

I think you feel something is wrong, and that is why you are presenting your questions here.

I would say 99% of the people that have experienced electric shocks have been in and out, appendage types. Chest shocks at that voltage and amperage is no joke.

This can likely all be covered by the electricians insurance.
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Old 05-26-2010, 02:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JR3300 View Post
Lesson learned...believe me. The only problem is, I'm an HVAC guy, not an electrician. There was an electrician not even 10 ft away installing a wall plug who did see me and my partner go up to work and didn't bother to warn us of dangling wires, nor were any wirenuts placed over these wires.

I hope he was a licensed electrician, and if he is, he needs to go back to re learn some lessons in safety... But I would suggest going to see an actual physician if you are experiencing any discomfort that is "out of the norm", better to have him/her make the proper diagnosis....

B. Morse
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Disclaimer: The example programs,circuits, projects and information I provide or post on this web site are for educational purposes only. By copying anything from this site posted by me, you agree to the "as is" nature of the programs, circuits, information and to the statements listed in this disclaimer.No warranty or liability is expressed or implied. Working with AC /DC voltages can be dangerous and even deadly. Proceed at your own risk!
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Old 05-26-2010, 04:19 AM
someonesdad someonesdad is offline
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JR3300: you definitely want to go see a doctor -- don't let some macho feeling that you're OK (or comments by electricians that it's no big deal) tell you otherwise. There are two main reasons: you probably had a near brush with death and you may have injuries you don't know about (just as the other posts have alerted you to). Just as importantly, if there are some injuries and you wait or ignore them, you might jeopardize your ability to be covered by your work insurance, workman's comp, whatever. And if you have others depending on you (e.g., family), you'd be doubly foolish to ignore sound medical advice.
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Old 05-26-2010, 11:42 AM
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t06afre t06afre is offline
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You should see a doctor. Just to get things documented.
In some cases a current may cause neural damage. But since you had no burns that is a good sign. Besides the current magnitude, the current path is also important. Besides the heart, that is very sensitive to electrical current. The tissue in the brain and spine are more sensitive to electrical current than other types tissues. It is routine in many operations to use electricity to cut tissue and stop bleedings. Just think about that fact
Your lower back pain could be that you during the shock, stretched some muscular tissue. And I also do not think from your symptoms that either your brain or spine was affected by this shock.
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Textbook Ohm's Law (again!) : Electrical Safety
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Worksheet Physical effects of electricity


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