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  #1  
Old 12-26-2009, 03:02 AM
Cajunbubba Cajunbubba is offline
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Red face Greenhouse wiring

I am wiring up a greenhouse that we built. I have installed 2 - 20 amp GFCI breakers and will use 12 guage wires. Because everything is in conduit I am trying to minimize wires. Here are my circuits:
1- recepticles on a timer switch for grow lights (about 1000 watts)
2 -(a)Exhaust fan and shutter motoers on a thermostat and reosatat (about 500 watts) & (b)additional recelpticles for possible heating pads

I am in the process of planning my wire pulls. I am using 3 wires Black (hot), White (neutral), Green (ground).

Main conduit runs overhead and drops down to various recepticles and stuff.

I would like to splice off the green and whites and run down to the recepticle but not back up to the main conduit. The black will go down and back up. (hopefully I have painted a picture). My qusetion is this going to create an inbalance for mu GFCI?
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Old 12-26-2009, 03:07 AM
Cajunbubba Cajunbubba is offline
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Default further clearification

do my wires (pigtails included) need to be all the same to avoid imbalance?
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Old 12-26-2009, 03:11 AM
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lmartinez lmartinez is offline
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Follow NEC 2008.
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Old 12-26-2009, 03:36 AM
Cajunbubba Cajunbubba is offline
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Default ??

Really did not answer my question.
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Old 12-26-2009, 03:44 AM
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lmartinez lmartinez is offline
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A schematic might be of help............
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Old 12-26-2009, 04:18 AM
Cajunbubba Cajunbubba is offline
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Default I'll post one in 16 hours

I will post one in 16 hours
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Old 12-26-2009, 06:15 AM
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SgtWookie SgtWookie is offline
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I really don't like to be critical, but...

Your project really requires the on-site scruitiny of a professional electrician.

I am NOT a professional electrician.

Furthermore, no professional electrician worth his or her salt would be able to give you proper advice remotely.

You need a professional electrician to look at your requirements and to keep you safe.
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Old 12-26-2009, 02:24 PM
Cajunbubba Cajunbubba is offline
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ok here is a basic view of what I want to to do. These are single 12 gauge wires. Seeing that I am proposing different lengths and junction points will this cause problems with my 20 AMP GFCI?
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File Type: pdf wire.pdf (23.8 KB, 22 views)
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  #9  
Old 12-26-2009, 03:30 PM
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Bill_Marsden Bill_Marsden is offline
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The GFI is basically a circuit hanging off your wiring, it shouldn't have a problem, as long as you aren't trying to use it to feed the other circuitry. If you are, don't. Use a GFI as if it were an outlet for each outlet.

This is the image you posted, cropped to fit.



You should also be aware which pin is hot, and which is neutral, it is important.



For what it's worth, I agree with Wookie completely, this is not a job for an amateur.
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File Type: png temp.PNG (21.4 KB, 42 views)
File Type: png temp1.PNG (1.5 KB, 40 views)
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Old 12-26-2009, 03:38 PM
jpanhalt jpanhalt is offline
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One thing to consider is how you are going to tap into the neutral and ground, if that is really what you mean to do. Remember that such taps must be in an accessible box.

Many electricians will simply run all three wires to the receptacle box (use a sufficiently large one) and make the taps or pigtails there. Be sure to consider that the box, if metallic, will also need to be grounded.

John
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