All About Circuits Forum  

Go Back   All About Circuits Forum > Electronics Forums > General Electronics Chat

Notices

General Electronics Chat Discussion forum for general chat about anything electronics related, including asking questions about material in the All About Circuits E-book, Worksheets, and Videos.

Reply   Post New Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 04-26-2006, 03:14 PM
ianderso ianderso is offline
New Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1
Default

While I've built many 9VDC solid-state projects (think effects for guitar players), I'm starting to test the waters on making some tube-driven devices. I was looking over some old schematics and kept seeing a reference to an "HT" attached to the plates of the tubes (usually ECC83s or similar) in the schems. I know it's a transformer reference, but what, exactly, does the "HT" mean?

Thanks,
IZA
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 04-26-2006, 03:32 PM
Papabravo's Avatar
Papabravo Papabravo is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Michigan, USA (GMT-5)
Posts: 5,521
Default

Quote:
Originally posted by ianderso@Apr 26 2006, 11:14 AM
While I've built many 9VDC solid-state projects (think effects for guitar players), I'm starting to test the waters on making some tube-driven devices. I was looking over some old schematics and kept seeing a reference to an "HT" attached to the plates of the tubes (usually ECC83s or similar) in the schems. I know it's a transformer reference, but what, exactly, does the "HT" mean?

Thanks,
IZA
I think it might mean "High Tension". This arcane terminology still shows up in high voltage circuits. It generally takes a step-up transformer to go from 120VAC to a typical +300VDC plate supply.
__________________
We never have time to do it right,
But we always have time to do it over.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 04-26-2006, 11:45 PM
windoze killa windoze killa is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Melbourne Australia
Posts: 605
Default

Quote:
Originally posted by Papabravo@Apr 27 2006, 02:32 AM
I think it might mean "High Tension". This arcane terminology still shows up in high voltage circuits. It generally takes a step-up transformer to go from 120VAC to a typical +300VDC plate supply.
You are correct. HT means High Tension and EHT is Extra High Tension. EHT transformers are generally in the KV range.

HT transformers can have an O/P anywhere from about 100V to about 1KV. Some are multi tapped to provide voltages for the screen grid and supressor grid as well as the plate supply.
__________________
Eddy Current is a little dizzy over Milli Volt.
Reply With Quote
Reply   Post New Thread

Tags


Related Site Pages
Section Title
Textbook Tubes versus Semiconductors : Electron Tubes
Textbook Microwave tubes : Electron Tubes
Textbook Display tubes : Electron Tubes
Textbook Ionization (gas-filled) tubes : Electron Tubes
Textbook Combination tubes : Electron Tubes
Textbook Special transformers and applications : Transformers
Textbook The triode : Electron Tubes
Textbook Vacuum tube audio amplifier : Discrete Semiconductor Circuits
Textbook Mutual inductance : Magnetism And Electromagnetism
Textbook What is a meter? : Dc Metering Circuits


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Class B -Transformer Coupled Push Pull Amplifier Vckay Homework Help 10 06-25-2009 08:06 AM
transformer ground voltage robb General Electronics Chat 11 01-04-2009 02:53 PM
problems with ground and a wall transformer JIM E General Electronics Chat 3 07-16-2006 09:48 PM
Special Power Current Transformer n1mr0d General Electronics Chat 7 04-25-2006 12:35 PM
POWER TRANSFORMER TINO General Electronics Chat 2 06-16-2004 11:45 PM

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 03:16 AM.


User-posted content, unless source quoted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Public Domain License.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.