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Old 05-26-2008, 06:09 AM
LukeDXB LukeDXB is offline
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Default multiple power sources (DC circuits)

Hi Everyone,

I have a general question.

I can calculate series and parallel circuits ok, with one power source, such as a battery but how do I work out resistance values when there are two power sources (in a DC circuit)?

For example, two 9v batterys wired in series, with 1 X 5 ohm and 1 X 10 ohm resistor and a 12v lamp - all in series.

Regards,

Luke
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Old 05-26-2008, 07:25 AM
nanovate nanovate is offline
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Quote:
two 9v batterys wired in series
add them together
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Old 05-26-2008, 02:59 PM
John Luciani's Avatar
John Luciani John Luciani is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LukeDXB View Post
Hi Everyone,

I have a general question.

I can calculate series and parallel circuits ok, with one power source, such as a battery but how do I work out resistance values when there are two power sources (in a DC circuit)?

For example, two 9v batterys wired in series, with 1 X 5 ohm and 1 X 10 ohm resistor and a 12v lamp - all in series.

Regards,

Luke
The general method would be to use superposition. You determine the effect due to each
power source individually, by disabling all but one source, and add the effects.

To disable a voltage source replace it with a short circuit. To disable a current source
replace it with an open circuit.

For two equal voltage sources in series disabling one source gives you a current V/R.
Disabling the second source also gives you a current V/R. Adding the two currents
together gives you 2V/R.

(* jcl *)
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